Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

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In early September 2020, Seattle, Wash., had some of the worst air quality in the world because of wildfire smoke. The city was among the first to create smoke shelters for the most vulnerable. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Shipping workers recorded the tide levels beginning in 1854 at St. George's Dock in Liverpool, England, creating valuable records for future scientists. Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Heritage Images/Getty Images

How Fast Are Oceans Rising? The Answer May Be In Century-Old Shipping Logs

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Adam Baske (left) and Capt. Rob Odlin of Running Tide Technologies in the Gulf of Maine. They release rope that's entwined with early-stage kelp, a fast growing seaweed that will soak up carbon dioxide. Fred Bever/Maine Public hide caption

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Fred Bever/Maine Public

'Run The Oil Industry In Reverse': Fighting Climate Change By Farming Kelp

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Electrical grid transmission towers in Pasadena, Calif. Major power outages from extreme weather have risen dramatically in the past two decades. John Antczak/AP hide caption

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John Antczak/AP

It's Not Just Texas. The Entire Energy Grid Needs An Upgrade For Extreme Weather

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This coyote was one of several collared by wildlife biologists monitoring their behavior in the Bay Area headlands. Authorities are trying to catch an unusually bold coyote in the East Bay responsible for attacks on humans. San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst N/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Imag hide caption

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San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst N/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Imag
Stacie McChesney / TED

Colette Pichon Battle: How Can We Prepare For The Next Hurricane Katrina?

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CalFire Captain Matt Newberry has been fighting fire for more than two decades, but he and his crew hit a wall last year. Climate change is increasing the frequency, intensity and range of wildfires, putting psychological strain on those tasked with trying to contain them. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

As Fires Worsen, A Mental Health Crisis For Those Battling Them

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Millions of monarch butterflies arrive each year in Mexico after travelling, in some cases, thousands of miles from the United States and Canada. Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images

A windfarm near Velva, North Dakota. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

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Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

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Soil on hilltops in this photo is lighter in color, revealing a loss of fertile topsoil. Evan Thaler for NPR hide caption

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Evan Thaler for NPR

New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms

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Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., during her Senate hearing Tuesday to be Interior Secretary. If confirmed, she would be the first Native American to hold the post. Jim Watson/AP hide caption

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Jim Watson/AP

Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business

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One week after winter storms triggered boil-water notices in Texas, more than 8.7 million people are still affected. Here, a volunteer loads food and bottled water at a mass distribution site in Del Valle, Texas. Thomas Ryan Allison/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Ryan Allison/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Power lines near Houston on Feb. 16. Some Texas residents are facing enormous power bills after wholesale prices for electricity skyrocketed amid last week's massive grid failure. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Rob Martin, who has been fishing off his boat for the last 29 years, and his partner haul up a 150-pound end trap while ropeless lobster fishing in Cape Cod Bay in Massachusetts. Eve Zuckoff/WCAI hide caption

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Eve Zuckoff/WCAI

'Ropeless' Lobster Fishing Could Save The Whales. Could It Kill The Industry?

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Pike Electric service trucks line up after a snowstorm on Tuesday in Fort Worth, Texas. Millions across the state have been without power, water or both, following historic low temperatures brought by winter weather. Ron Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

Texas Is Defined By Energy. How Did The State's Power Grid Fail So Massively?

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