Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

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The Environmental Protection Agency's final version of its Affordable Clean Energy rule is supported by the coal industry, but it's not clear that it will be enough to stop more coal-fired power plants from closing. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Trump Administration Weakens Climate Plan To Help Coal Plants Stay Open

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A tugboat operator secures a floating razor wire security fence during an emergency response exercise at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, last September. A new expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline would significantly expand tanker traffic in the region. Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Ohio's Cuyahoga River Came Back To Life 50 Years After It Caught On Fire

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In California's Mojave Desert sits First Solar Inc.'s Desert Sunlight Solar Farm. California is among the states leading the decarbonization charge. Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?

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50 Years Later: Burning Cuyahoga River Called Poster Child For Clean Water Act

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Anne Schauer-Gimenez (from left) Allison Pieja and Molly Morse of Mango Materials stand next to the biopolymer fermenter at a sewage treatment plant next to San Francisco Bay. The fermenter feeds bacteria the methane they need to produce a biological form of plastic. Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Replacing Plastic: Can Bacteria Help Us Break The Habit?

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The Gulf Of Mexico's Expanding Dead Zone

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High Flooding On Lake Ontario And St. Lawrence River

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A coyote runs down the road in Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park. In 2018, more than 68,000 coyotes were killed in the U.S., including 5,600 just in Wyoming, under an Agriculture Department program. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Killing Coyotes Is Not As Effective As Once Thought, Researchers Say

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New Orleans Sues Big Oil

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The Flint Water Plant tower in Flint, Mich., where drinking water became tainted after the city switched from the Detroit system and began drawing from the Flint River in April 2014 to save money. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

A comparison of how the old and upgraded U.S. global weather forecast models predicted the "bomb cyclone" that hit the Northeast U.S. in January 2018. The old NOAA model (left) estimated a smaller amount of snowfall than what actually happened (right). The updated model (middle) was more accurate. NOAA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NOAA/Screenshot by NPR

Federal Land Managers Propose Rule Change To Fast Track Forest Management Projects

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