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A year after Hurricane Maria touched down in September 2017, the island is still recovering. On Tuesday lawyers for the government admitted they had not yet overhauled the island's emergency response plans for the next major hurricane. Angel Valentin/Getty Images hide caption

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Angel Valentin/Getty Images

Listen: Court Hearing

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Oregon State University oceanographer Jack Barth deploys a glider that will spend weeks at sea collecting data on everything from dissolved oxygen levels to temperature. "When we used to think about hypoxia in the ocean, we think about little areas. But now what we're looking at is...out in the ocean, there's low oxygen...all along the coast," he says. Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Coastal Pacific Oxygen Levels Now Plummet Once A Year

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Plastic garbage lying on the beach in Greece. The move would impose a complete ban on some single-use plastics across the European Union and a reduction on others, aiming to implement most measures by the mid-2020s. Milos Bicanski/Getty Images hide caption

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Milos Bicanski/Getty Images

An aerial view of Hawaii's East Island after it was struck by Hurricane Walaka last month. The island, home to endangered monk seals and Hawaiian green sea turtles, nearly disappeared after the storm. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association

Blockchain And Climate Change

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Super Typhoon Yutu, seen in infrared satellite imagery. See those white outlines at the heart of Yutu's red buzz-saw-like shape? Those are the Northern Mariana Islands. Courtesy of NESDIS Satellite Services Division (NOAA) hide caption

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Courtesy of NESDIS Satellite Services Division (NOAA)

Pine Knoll Plantation farm manager Mitch Bulger near one of the thousands of pecan trees blown down by Hurricane Michael. Grant Blankenship/Georgia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Grant Blankenship/Georgia Public Broadcasting

Another Storm Victim — Pecan Groves In Southwest Georgia

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Microplastics are not just showing up on beaches like this one in the Canary Islands — a very small study shows that they are in human waste in many parts of the world. Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images

Beachgoers enjoy the shore in Mazatlan, Sinaloa state, Mexico on Sunday. Hurricane Willa, now a Category 5, is expected to land in the region late Tuesday or Wednesday. Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images

A message displayed on a window of a motel room in Panama City, Fla., where survivors continue to live amid the damage from Hurricane Michael. Family and friends are still trying to locate loved ones who survived the storm. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Crowdsourcing To Find Survivors Of Hurricane Michael

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In this November 1936 photo from the U.S. Farm Security Administration, a mother, originally from Oklahoma stands with her five children near Fresno, Calif., where she works as a cotton picker. The Dust Bowl led to a massive migration of Midwestern farmers out of the region, many of whom traveled to California in search of jobs. Dorothea Lange/AP hide caption

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Dorothea Lange/AP