Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

China's Crackdown On Polluters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/574753355/574753356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Salton Sea in 2000, when rising water flooded nearby brush. The water is red with micro-organisms. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

'Farm To City' Deal To Dry Out Stretches Of California's Legendary Salton Sea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/574479320/574479321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thomas Fire Evacuees Return Home To Find What's Left

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/574314903/574314904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal Appeals Court Gives EPA 90 Days To Propose Long-Awaited Lead Standards

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/574314896/574314897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two birds covered in oil sit on a rock near Refugio State Beach in Goleta, Calif., in 2015 after an oil spill from an abandoned pipeline spread over the beach. The Department of the Interior says it will no longer criminally prosecute energy companies that kill birds accidentally. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

An image from a report by the State Water Board shows the area of the headwaters of Strawberry Creek in the San Bernardino National Forest. The board says Nestle lacks the permits it needs to extract all of the water it's been taking from the area. California State Water Board hide caption

toggle caption
California State Water Board

Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly recovering after Hurricane Maria. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

After Maria, One Of The World's Best Bioluminescent Bays Slowly Begins To Glow Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/573000699/573739736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pennsylvania City Gets Record-Breaking 56.5 Inches Of Snow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/573628875/573628876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Harvey, Texans Are Preparing For Future With Raised Homes, Private Flood Gates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/573628710/573628711" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Corals around the world have been dying because of warming waters and pollution. Some researchers hope they can reverse the trend by growing new corals in the lab. Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons

As Corals Wither Around The World, Scientists Try IVF

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556121513/573628906" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript