Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

House Democrats Form New 'Climate Crisis' Committee

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In this photo from March, a North Atlantic right whale feeds off the coast of Massachusetts. A new North Atlantic right whale calf was just spotted — and it's the first calf sighting in over a year. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

How Environmental Policies Fared In Trump's Cross Hairs In 2018

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The Trump administration EPA says regulations to reduce power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants are too costly and should no longer be considered legally "appropriate and necessary." Matt Brown/AP hide caption

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Matt Brown/AP

Jay McAbee, a bus driver with the Greenville, S.C., school district, waits by his bus in Charleston, S.C., in October of 2016, for word of when to start evacuating the city's residents in advance of Hurricane Matthew. Simply having enough buses to carry pets as well as people can be key to convincing residents they need to leave ahead of a big storm, emergency responders say. Mic Smith/AP hide caption

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Mic Smith/AP

Safely Evacuating The Elderly In Any Emergency Takes Planning And Practice

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The devastation from Hurricane Michael over Mexico Beach, Fla. A massive federal report released in November warns that climate change is fueling extreme weather disasters like hurricanes and wildfires. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Colorado Governor-Elect Pushes For 100 Percent Renewable Energy

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Examining The Link Between Climate And Weather

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Ash spewing from Mount Etna is seen from the Italian city of Catania on Monday. A 4.8 magnitude earthquake followed, early Wednesday morning. Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Prosecutors say TEPCO leaders should have known the risks a tsunami could pose to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which sits along Japan's eastern coast. Here, the Unit 3 reactor is seen this past summer, amid storage tanks of radiation-contaminated water. Kimimasa Mayama /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kimimasa Mayama /AFP/Getty Images

A tractor plows soil where a failed wheat crop once stood on Matt Isgar's ranch and farm in Hesperus, Colo. Isgar is hoping the soil will get enough moisture in coming months so he can plant pinto beans next season. Kami Engstrom/Courtesy of Matt Isgar hide caption

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Kami Engstrom/Courtesy of Matt Isgar

There's A Lot At Stake In The Weekly U.S. Drought Map

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Japan once labeled its whaling vessels with prominent "Research" tags. The country will resume commercial whaling hunts in 2019. Here, the whaling ships Yushin Maru (right) and Yushin Maru No. 2 are seen before leaving for the Antarctic Ocean for a whale hunt in 2015. In the future, Japanese whaling ships will not operate in the Antarctic. Kyodo/Reuters hide caption

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Kyodo/Reuters

At the restaurant Siren by Robert Wiedmaier, pastry chef Maddy Morrissey uses marigold as the base for a Japanese dessert served with nasturtium leaves, flower petals and pineapple sage shortbread. Brian McBride/RWRestaurant Group hide caption

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Brian McBride/RWRestaurant Group

A firefighter battles the Woolsey Fire burning a home in Malibu, Calif. in November. Fire scientists are finding that homes most frequently burn from flying embers after the initial blaze has passed through. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

How Houses Themselves Become Fuel For Wildfires

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