Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Urban Camouflage for Reptiles: "I basically thought about how turtles have camouflage that doesn't really work very well for them in the urban environments they often live in these days," Keats said. "So my thought was, can we go to our military and look at urban warfare as inspiration." Jonathon Keats hide caption

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Jonathon Keats

Artist's Exhibit Borrows Human Tech To Solve Nature's Manmade Problems

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Some In Corporate America Push Back On Trump's Climate Regulations Roll Back

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Rising Seas Threaten Coastal Military Bases

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Winter rains have eased the drought in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area northwest of Los Angeles. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

With Drought Emergency Over, Californians Debate Lifting Water Restrictions

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In its prime, the Hero sailed through frigid temperatures and ice-strewn waters in the South Pole. But now it's sinking, leaking oil and threatening Washington's oysters. Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting

EPA Says It Will Allow Continued Sale Of Controversial Pesticide

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At Kemper, Mississippi Power has built an entirely new coal plant from the ground up. But the plant, which uses carbon capture technology, has experienced missed deadlines, cost overruns and other problems. Courtesy of Mississippi Power hide caption

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Courtesy of Mississippi Power

Climate-Friendly Coal Technology Works But Is Proving Difficult To Scale Up

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The levees below the Oroville Dam were damaged by heavy floodwaters this winter and many need repairs. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers

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Pesticide warning sign in an orange grove. The sign, in English and Spanish, warns that the pesticide chlorpyrifos, or Lorsban, has been applied to these orange trees. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

EPA Decides Not To Ban A Pesticide, Despite Its Own Evidence Of Risk

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An M-44 device — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Several petitions are now calling for the removal of these devices used to protect livestock from predators. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls M-44s "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office

Passengers Take Flight To View Southern Lights

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Measuring The Impact Of Rolling Back Environmental Regulations

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California Doubles Down On Efforts To Slow Climate Change

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Former Rep. Bob Inglis On Trump Environmental Regulation Rollbacks

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