Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

MIAMI, FL — TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2019-- Interested buyers view the live model of Monad Terrace Luxury Development, a luxury high rise in an area of heavy infrastructural investment to protect their building from sea level rise and hurricanes Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR hide caption

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Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR

Building For An Uncertain Future: Miami Residents Adapt To The Changing Climate

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Like most American ski areas, Mammoth Mountain Ski Area operates on U.S. Forest Service land thanks to a federal lease. Shrinking federal budgets to maintain recreational access to public lands mean locals have to be creative to keep trails open and safe. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

On Public Lands, Visitors Surge While Federal Management Funds Decline

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Cheryl Holder takes a patient's vitals in Miami on March 18. Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR hide caption

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Maria Alejandra Cardona for NPR

In Florida, Doctors See Climate Change Hurting Their Most Vulnerable Patients

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Smog fills Utah's Salt Lake Valley in January 2017. Winter weather in the area often traps air pollution that is bad for public health. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

EPA Science Panel Considering Guidelines That Upend Basic Air Pollution Science

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The sea squirt Ascidia sydneiensis, a tubelike animal that squirts water out of its body when alarmed, is one of 48 additional nonnative marine species in the Galapagos Islands documented in a newly published study. Previously, researchers knew of only five. Courtesy of Jim Carlton hide caption

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Courtesy of Jim Carlton

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

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David Bernhardt, a former oil and gas lobbyist, speaks before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee at his confirmation hearing to head the Interior Department, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 28, 2019. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A woman speaks on her phone while driving. Both drivers and walkers use cell data 4,000 percent more than they did in 2008, which means they aren't watching the roads. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

Why Pedestrian Deaths Are At A 30-Year High

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A historical marker commemorates the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island — the most serious in U.S. history. To the left are the cooling towers for the mothballed Unit 2 reactor, which partially melted down. Joanne Cassaro/WITF hide caption

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Joanne Cassaro/WITF

40 Years After A Partial Nuclear Meltdown, A New Push To Keep Three Mile Island Open

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Power lines and power-generating windmills rise above the rural landscape on June 13, 2018, near Dwight, Ill. Driven by falling costs, global spending on renewable energy sources like wind and solar is now outpacing investment in electricity from fossil fuels and nuclear power. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Idaho Power says it already gets nearly half its energy from hydroelectric dams such as the Swan Falls Dam on the Snake River, just south of Boise. The utility plans to phase out its use of coal power plants. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

The car of storm chasers, Kelley Williamson and Randall Yarnall, was destroyed during the March 2017 tornado near Spur, Texas, leaving both men along with storm spotter, Corbin Lee Jaeger dead. The Law Offices of Robert A. Ball hide caption

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The Law Offices of Robert A. Ball

GOP Sen. Lamar Alexander Wants To Address Climate Change Without The Green New Deal

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