Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Drought In Calif. Creates Water Wars Between Farmers, Developers, Residents

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Vatican Hosts Climate Change Conference Ahead Of Papal Encyclical

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A man stands near collapsed houses in Bhaktapur, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, on April 27, two days after a magnitude-7.8 earthquake hit Nepal. Aftershocks tend to get less frequent with time, scientists say, but not necessarily gentler. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Big Aftershocks In Nepal Could Persist For Years

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California Cemeteries Adapt To Water Restrictions To Avoid Going Dry

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As California's Economy Reels From Drought, At Least One Industry Is Doing Fine

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Callery pear trees in Pittsburgh. The smell of the invasive trees has been compared to rotting fish and other stinky things. Luke H. Gordon/Flickr hide caption

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Luke H. Gordon/Flickr

What's That Smell? The Beautiful Tree That's Causing Quite A Stink

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California Cities Struggle To Meet Water Conservation Targets

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"We could learn a lot from ants about how effective a noisy, messy system could be." — Deborah Gordon James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Why Don't Ants Need A Leader?

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Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why

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A cherry tree and its blossoms are covered with snow in an orchard near Traverse City, Mich. Three years ago, almost every fruit crop in Michigan was frozen out when cold temperatures followed some 80 degree days in March. John L. Russell/AP hide caption

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John L. Russell/AP

Fruit Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage

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"Part of the reason we're here is because climate change is threatening this treasure and the communities that depend on it," Obama said Wednesday of his visit to Everglades National Park in Florida. "If we don't act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it." Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower. Albin Andersson/Nature hide caption

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Albin Andersson/Nature

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

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