Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Weather Technology Falters Amid Communication Breakdown

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Monarchs spend their winters in the central mountains of Mexico before traveling up through the United States to Canada. Sandy and Chuck Harris/Flickr hide caption

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Sandy and Chuck Harris/Flickr

Pros And Cons Of Proposed Maine Woods National Park

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Prescribed Burns Help Rebirth Sequoias After 2015 Wildfire

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Rwanda is known as "le pays des milles collines" €-- the land of a thousand hills. Weather varies by altitude; for farmers, detailed forecasts can make a huge difference. Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society hide caption

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Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society

Turns Out You Do Need A Weatherman To Know Which Way The Wind Blew

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Protests, Suspicion In Vietnam Over Government's Response To Fish Kill

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A contractor prepares to cut off the top of a coal bed methane well near Gillette, Wyo., in 2015. It's one of thousands of abandoned, plugged wells sprinkled throughout Wyoming and Colorado. Stephanie Joyce/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

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Stephanie Joyce/Wyoming Public Media

Danger Below? New Properties Hide Abandoned Oil And Gas Wells

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U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz takes part in a press conference at the end of the 2015 meeting of the International Energy Agency Governing Board on Nov. 18, 2015 in Paris. ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Says Government Can Help Clean Energy Innovation

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Wrecked By Superstorm Sandy, Conservationists Work To Restore Migratory Birds' Refuge

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Scientists in California are turning to big data to help save the red-legged frog, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Gary Kittleson hide caption

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Gary Kittleson

Using Algorithms To Catch The Sounds Of Endangered Frogs

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Ault Mayor Butch White stands on a road dividing two farms, one irrigated and one dried up. Liz Baker hide caption

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Liz Baker

In Colorado, Farmers and Cities Battle Over Water Rights

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National Public Radio host, Michel Martin asks a question at the live performance of Martin's show, Going There at Colorado State University Tuesday May 24, 2016. The show was titled, " The Future of Water." V. Richard Haro/Richard Haro Photography hide caption

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V. Richard Haro/Richard Haro Photography

A Conversation About The Future Of Water

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Platform Check: How Trump's Energy Plan Stacks Up To The Democrats

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society

Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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