Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Children play on a Nigerian oil-flow station in 2007. Nigeria, a major oil source for the United States, is riddled with ancient pipes and constant spills. That, plus the geopolitical challenges involved, is why much of Nigeria's crude is the kind of "tough oil" that author Michael Klare describes. George Osodi/AP hide caption

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George Osodi/AP

Plaquemines Parish coastal zone director P.J. Hahn lifts an oil-covered pelican, which was stuck in oil at Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, just off the Gulf of Mexico, in early June. Gerald Herbert/AP Photo hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP Photo

Oil stains the rocks along a beach in Port Fourchon, La. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Hurricane Alex Hinders Gulf Cleanup Crews

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Efforts to clean the beach in Elmer's Island, La., were stopped Tuesday due to bad weather created by Tropical Storm Alex. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The looming storm could postpone BP's plans to double the amount of oil they capture from the spill. Here, a boat uses a boom and absorbent material to soak up oil on the surface of the water near Grand Isle, La., on Monday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Cleanup workers maneuver an oil boom in Bataria Bay on the coast of Louisiana. With the down economy, their are plenty of people hoping for cleanup jobs, but there are few to be found. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Cleanup Jobs Are Hard To Find In The Gulf

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Forget Hybrids; Make Your Own Electric Car

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At the midway point of the Appalachian Trail, most hikers stop in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., to have their photographs taken at the offices of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, which administers the trail for the National Park Service. Brad Horn/NPR hide caption

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The Dangers Of Asian Carp In Great Lakes

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Add Florida's Dune Lakes To Oil Spill Casualties

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Oil-soaked booms sit on top of a marsh in Barataria Bay. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

The Gulf oil spill has prompted a lot of soul-searching. Michael Spooneybarger/AP hide caption

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Michael Spooneybarger/AP