Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Endophytes are microbes that live inside plants — the ones tagged with a fluorescent dye in this image are found in poplars. The microbes gather nitrogen from the air, turning it into a form plants can use, a process called nitrogen fixation. Researchers are looking at how these microbes could be used to help crops like rice and corn make their own fertilizer. Sam Scharffenberger hide caption

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Sam Scharffenberger

Cape Town Executive Deputy Mayor Ian Neilson speaks at the press conference where he announced Thursday that, if appropriate water restrictions are maintained, there will be no Day Zero for 2019. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Cape Town Averts 'Day Zero' By Limiting Water Use

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In a file photo from 2004, a sign at the entrance to the Arrowhead Mountain Spring Water Company bottling plant, owned by Swiss conglomerate Nestlé, on the Morongo Indian Reservation near Cabazon, Calif. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

An Indonesian ranger inspects a peat forest fire in Aceh province in July 2017. Indonesia, unlike most of the world, lost less overall tree cover than usual last year. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images

Killdeer with two eggs, photographed in Arizona under controlled conditions. A nest discovered by organizers of the RBC Bluesfest in Ottawa, Canada has prevented them from constructing its main stage. Wild Horizon/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Wild Horizon/UIG via Getty Images

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha spearheaded efforts to publicize and address the water crisis in Flint, Mich. Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Pediatrician Who Exposed Flint Water Crisis Shares Her 'Story Of Resistance'

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Beavers are known as "ecosystem engineers," species that make precise and transformative changes to their lived environment. Larry Smith/Flickr hide caption

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Larry Smith/Flickr

The Bountiful Benefits Of Bringing Back The Beavers

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A gas flare is seen at a natural gas processing facility near Williston, N.D. in 2015. A new study says the amount of methane leaking is more than government estimates. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Large Methane Leaks Threaten Perception Of 'Clean' Natural Gas

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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke at his confirmation hearing last year. Congressional Democrats and a public watchdog group are calling for an ethics investigation into Zinke over a land deal between his family foundation and oil and gas company Halliburton. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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A Miami-Dade County mosquito control worker sprays around a home in August 2016 in the Wynwood area of Miami. A University of Florida study recently identified the first known human case of the mosquito-borne Keystone virus. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

The northern white-cheeked gibbon is a critically endangered ape native to China, Vietnam and Laos. Scientists have discovered a new species of gibbon, now extinct, that lived in China as recently as 2,200 years ago. Joachim S. Müller/Flickr hide caption

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Joachim S. Müller/Flickr

Rice within the octagon in this field is part of an experiment to grow rice under different levels of carbon dioxide. Toshihiro Hasegawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan hide caption

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Toshihiro Hasegawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan

As Carbon Dioxide Levels Rise, Major Crops Are Losing Nutrients

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