Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

The mother orca, known as J-35, pushes her dead calf to the surface last week off the coast of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The infant orca died shortly after its birth, but its mother has been observed carrying it with her in the days afterward. Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP hide caption

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Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP

High-speed tracking dogs have been a game-changer in the fight against rhino poaching in South Africa. Their success depends on their ability to work as a team, which means they sleep and eat in the pack-sized enclosures shown above. David Fuchs hide caption

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David Fuchs

To Combat Rhino Poaching, Dogs Are Giving South African Park Rangers A Crucial Assist

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Wildfires More Common in Western U.S.

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A female orca that appears to be grieving has been carrying her dead calf in the water, keeping it afloat since the baby died more than a week ago. Taylor Shedd/Soundwatch, taken under NMFS MMPA permit #21114 hide caption

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Taylor Shedd/Soundwatch, taken under NMFS MMPA permit #21114

Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

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Bubble tea, or boba, features large tapioca balls at the bottom meant to be sucked up through a plastic straw. Vendors say paper straws don't always work as well, and they're more expensive. Samantha Shanahan/KQED hide caption

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Samantha Shanahan/KQED

San Francisco Is Poised To Ban Plastic Straws. That's Got Bubble Tea Shops Worried

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As Ban On Plastic Straws Spreads, Demand For Paper Alternatives Increases

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California Allocates $3 Billion For New Water Storage Projects

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Deadly Carr Wildfire Testing Resources Of Local Officials In Northern California

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Hell's Backbone Grill is located in Boulder, Utah, about 250 miles south of Salt Lake City. The restaurant's owners are fighting Trump's plans to slash the size of nearby Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument by more than half. Ace Kvale hide caption

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Ace Kvale

Changing Climate Pushes Arid West Eastward, Impacting Farming

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A woman uses a portable fan to cool herself in Tokyo on Tuesday as Japan suffers from a heat wave. Scientists say extreme weather events will likely happen more often as the planet gets warmer. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

When The Weather Is Extreme, Is Climate Change To Blame?

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Wildfires In Western U.S. Could Affect Air Quality For Prolonged Period Of Time

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Report Shows Trump Administration Issued Permits For Lion Trophies To Republican Donors

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