Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

D.C. Officials Start To Rethink Swimming Ban In Rivers After Years Of Cleanup Efforts

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Cattle graze in pasture formed by cleared rainforest land in Pará, Brazil. A new online tool makes it easier for food companies to detect this kind of land-clearing by their suppliers. Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Don't Cut Those Trees — Big Food Might Be Watching

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Ethiopians Plant 350 Million Trees As Part Of 'Green Legacy' Program

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Trucks churn up coal dust at the Tavan Tolgoi coal mine in the South Gobi desert. The Tavan Tolgoi deposit is estimated to possess 6.5 billion tons of coal, including high-grade coking coal — a product vital to the steel-making process. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Mongolia's Long Road To Mining Wealth

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In Las Vegas, There Are Swarms Of Grasshoppers Big Enough To Show Up On Weather Radar

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The owner of Holiday Inn and InterContinental Hotels announced Tuesday that it will switch to bulk-size bathroom amenities across the hotel group. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

A discarded plastic bottle lies on the beach at Sandy Hook, N.J. Packaging is the largest source of the plastic waste that now blankets our planet. Wayne Parry/AP hide caption

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Wayne Parry/AP

Plastics Or People? At Least 1 Of Them Has To Change To Clean Up Our Mess

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Rapid population growth in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, coupled with a household dependence on coal for heating and cooking has created perfect conditions for one of the most extreme cases of air pollution in the world. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Mongolia's Capital Banned Coal To Fix Its Pollution Problem. Will It Work?

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A Pipistrel Taurus Electro electric two-seat airplane flies above Ajdovscina, Slovenia. Jure Makovec/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jure Makovec/AFP/Getty Images

With An Eye Toward Lower Emissions, Clean Air Travel Gets Off The Ground

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In Florida's Lake Okeechobee, huge blooms of blue-green algae have become an annual occurrence. The Army Corps of Engineers is testing methods based on wastewater treatment to remove the green slime, which can produce toxins that threaten drinking water supplies, local economies and human health. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

A New Old Way To Combat Toxic Algae: Float It Up, Then Skim It Off

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Herders bury animal carcasses in 2010 in Mongolia's Dundgovi province. A decade ago, an extreme winter — known in Mongolia as a dzud — claimed the lives of 22% of the nation's livestock and sped up migration from rural areas to urban centers. Jargal Byambasuren/Reuters hide caption

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Jargal Byambasuren/Reuters

The Deadly Winters That Have Transformed Life For Herders In Mongolia

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There Are More Fireflies In Chicago Than Usual This Year. Here's Why

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Hydroelectric Dam Project Could Threaten Tanzanian Game Reserve, Conservationists Say

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Zara's parent company Inditex announced new sustainability goals this month. But can a fast-fashion brand built on growth truly become sustainable? Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images

Can Fast Fashion And Sustainability Be Stitched Together?

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For the second time in a month, an intense heat wave has hit Western Europe, particularly France. In Toulouse, temperatures reached 90 degrees Fahrenheit by 10 p.m. This heat wave is characterized by unusually high temperatures at night. Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Opinion: Is Anything More Urgent Than The Temperature Of Our Planet?

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