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Europe

The acting head of the U.S. Agency for Global Media has fired the presidents and boards of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia and the Middle East Broadcasting Networks. Above, the headquarters of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty is seen in Prague in January 2010. Michal Kamaryt/AP hide caption

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Michal Kamaryt/AP

Alternative for Germany leaders Björn Höcke (right) and Alexander Gauland celebrate their party's election results in Erfurt, Germany, in 2019, when voters in Thuringia elected a new state parliament. The AfD now has 88 members in Germany's federal parliament, more than 12% representation. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jens Meyer/AP

Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution

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Police clash with supporters of US President Donald Trump who breached security and entered the Capitol building in Washington D.C. Mostafa Bassim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Mostafa Bassim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

An official has a blood pressure test before receiving the Sinovac coronavirus vaccine, developed in China, at a hospital in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, on January 15. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP via Getty hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP via Getty

China's Sinovac Vaccine Is Rolling Out Around The World. Will It Work?

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Opposition leader Alexei Navalny is escorted out of a police station in Khimki, outside Moscow, following the court ruling that ordered him jailed for 30 days. Alexander Nemenov /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov /AFP via Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was detained on Sunday upon his arrival in Moscow. He had spent nearly the last five months recovering in Germany after being poisoned in August. Frederick Florin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick Florin/AFP via Getty Images

A group of former displaced persons helps load the Freedom Bell aboard a Navy transport vessel in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Oct. 9, 1950. One of the children, Eva Zandler, 8, originally from Poland, presents a scroll — to be enshrined in the Freedom Bell's tower in Berlin — to Frederick Osborn, the New York City chairman of the Crusade for Freedom. Tom Fitzsimmons/AP hide caption

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Tom Fitzsimmons/AP

A photo shows seats with stickers to respect social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in the Theatre de l'Archeveche in Aix-en-Provence, southern France, on July 23, 2020. Clement Mahoudeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Clement Mahoudeau/AFP via Getty Images

In France, Performing Artists Are Guaranteed Unemployment Income

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Paramedics prepare an ambulance outside the Royal London Hospital on Friday. Mayor Sadiq Khan has declared a "major incident," warning that hospitals in the British capital could soon be overwhelmed after a surge in coronavirus infections. Ben Stansall /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall /AFP via Getty Images

A nurse prepares to administer the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to Dr. Jean-Christophe Richard in La Croix-Rousse hospital, in Lyon, France, on Wednesday. Amid public outcry, France's health minister promised Tuesday an "exponential" acceleration of his country's slow coronavirus vaccination process. Laurent Cipriani/AP hide caption

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Laurent Cipriani/AP

German Minister for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth Franziska Giffey during the meeting of the German cabinet on Wednesday in Berlin. The cabinet approved a draft law that would require women on the executive boards of large publicly held companies. Clemens Bilan/Getty Images hide caption

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Clemens Bilan/Getty Images

A bottle of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine is shown before being used last month in Topeka, Kan. The European Medicines Agency has recommended authorizing the drug on a conditional basis. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Uncertainty about President Trump's plans for the upcoming inauguration has sparked speculation over whether he might travel to Scotland rather than attend the ceremony. Here he plays at his Turnberry golf resort in 2018. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

Front pages of main polish newspapers are pictured one day after the first round of the presidential election in Poland on June 29. European poll observers say "media bias" influenced recent Polish elections. Janek Skarzynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Janek Skarzynski/AFP via Getty Images

Poland's Government Tightens Its Control Over Media

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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange faces 18 federal counts related to allegations of illegally obtaining, receiving and disclosing classified information. He is accused of conspiring to hack U.S. government computer networks, and obtain and publish classified documents related to national security. John Thys/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John Thys/AFP via Getty Images

Police break up a rave in Lieuron in northwestern France. Some 2,500 partygoers attended an illegal New Year rave, violently clashing with police who failed to stop it and sparking concern the underground event could spread the coronavirus. Jean-Francois Monier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-Francois Monier/AFP via Getty Images

The final restoration project by the nonprofit Advancing Women Artists group features works by Violante Ferroni, an 18th century prodigy about whom little is known today. Francesco Cacchiani/AWA hide caption

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Francesco Cacchiani/AWA

'Where Are The Women?': Uncovering The Lost Works Of Female Renaissance Artists

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