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Digital creator Kyana Sue Powers says residents of Vestmannaeyjar treat puffling season as a regular part of life. "It's just what you do, it's as normal to do as recycling cans," she told NPR. Kyana Sue Powers hide caption

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Kyana Sue Powers

Police officers detain a man in Moscow on Saturday following calls to protest against the military draft announcement. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

From left, The League's Matteo Salvini, Forza Italia's Silvio Berlusconi, Brothers of Italy's Giorgia Meloni and Noi Con l'Italia's Maurizio Lupi attend the center-right coalition closing rally in Rome on Thursday. Italians have elected their country's most right-wing government since the end of World War II. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

What you need to know about Italy's new far-right leader Giorgia Meloni

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From left: Philippa, 23, from Sydney, Australia; Laura, 23, from Melbourne; and Isabella, 23, from Sydney wait in line to enter Tresor, one of Germany's popular nightclubs for electronic music, in Berlin in the early morning hours of Sept. 4. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

How a whiskey-fueled meeting in 1949 led to Berlin's famed techno scene

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People arrive at a parking lot in Zaporizhzhia from places like Melitopol and Kherson, areas that have been occupied by Russia for months now. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Russia begins annexation vote, illegal under international law, in occupied Ukraine

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Yaroslav Holovatenko (left) and a friend with their McDonald's meals in Kyiv on Wednesday. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Westerman/NPR

McDonald's reopens in Ukraine, feeding customers' nostalgia — and future hopes

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Luda Toryanyk, 58, walks across the railroad tracks in Kozacha Lopan, Ukraine, on Sunday. The village was retaken by Ukrainian troops on Sept. 11 after being occupied by Russian forces for more than six months. Toryanyk carries home bags of food that Ukrainian volunteers were distributing in the center of the village. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

In a retaken border village, Ukrainians point to signs of Russian abuse of civilians

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Russian President Vladimir Putin gives a speech Wednesday at a ceremony. In separate remarks, Putin said Russia will mobilize additional troops to fight in Ukraine and he expressed support for referendums in parts of Ukraine on joining Russia. Ilya Pitalev/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ilya Pitalev/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. military veterans Andy Huynh, left, and Alexander Drueke. The two veterans, who disappeared while fighting Russia with Ukrainian forces on June 9, have been released after about three months in captivity, relatives said Wednesday, Sept. 21. Jeronimo Nisa/The Decatur Daily, left; and Lois "Bunny" Drueke/Dianna Shaw/AP hide caption

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Jeronimo Nisa/The Decatur Daily, left; and Lois "Bunny" Drueke/Dianna Shaw/AP

The building housing Mykolaiv's regional government, bombed early in the war, lies in ruins on Aug. 11. Governor Vitaliy Kim says he knew he was the target "because it was my window." Thirty-seven of his colleagues died in the bombing. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Ukraine hunts for pro-Moscow collaborators suspected of helping Russia strike targets

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In this image made from video released by the Russian Presidential Press Service, Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the nation in Moscow, Russia, Sept. 21, 2022. AP hide caption

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AP

Putin is mobilizing hundreds of thousands of Russian reservists to fight in Ukraine

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A boy rides a bicycle near an armored tank with a Ukrainian flag in the town of Izium, recently liberated by Ukrainian armed forces, in the Kharkiv region on Monday. Russian troops occupied Izium on April 1. Oleksii Chumachenko/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Oleksii Chumachenko/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Russia makes moves to annex separatist regions in Ukraine

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Staff and volunteers load a camel into a vehicle to be evacuated from Feldman Ecopark in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on May 4. The zoo has been shelled repeatedly during the Russian invasion. At least five staff or volunteers were killed and nearly 100 animals at the zoo died as of April. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

Dodging Russian bombs, these volunteers risk it all to save Ukraine's animals

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The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II arrives at Windsor Castle for the Committal Service Monday in Windsor, England. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Mourners watch Queen Elizabeth's hearse as it drives along the Long Walk on Monday in Windsor, England. The committal service at Windsor Castle's St. George's Chapel took place following the state funeral at Westminster Abbey. A private burial in the King George VI Memorial Chapel followed. Richard Heathcote/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Heathcote/Getty Images

Soldiers carry coffins during funerals at a military cemetery in Yerevan, Armenia's capital, on March 2, 2021, for fighters killed during the war in Nagorno-Karabakh. Aris Messinis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/AFP via Getty Images

Anjelo Disons poses for a picture after speaking about his views on the recent events surrounding the queen's death and the monarchy at the Peckham Festival in London. Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR hide caption

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Elizabeth Dalziel for NPR