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Many banned books lists include Raina Telgemeier's Drama, Brendan Kiely and Jason Reynolds's All American Boys, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, Benjamin Alire Sáenz's Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Ruby Bridge's This is Your Time, and Toni Morrison's Beloved. Estefania Mitre/NPR/NPR hide caption

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Estefania Mitre/NPR/NPR

What people miss in the conversation about banned books

Guest host Ayesha Rascoe is joined by NPR senior editor Barrie Hardymon and Traci Thomas, host of The Stacks podcast, to talk about banned books. They talk about why it's important for kids to discover books freely, even if that means starting a hard conversation with them. They also discuss their favorite — and least favorite — books that often show up on banned book lists.

What people miss in the conversation about banned books

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Thanksgiving is a day at the beach — quite literally — for young Liberians. Above, the beach in West Point is a sandy playing field for soccer lovers. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Sam Rowe for NPR

Parents are scrambling after schools suddenly cancel class over staffing and burnout

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Sunny Reed, who was adopted from South Korea into a white American family, says sharing that she's adopted makes some people question whether she knows the actual Asian experience. Courtesy of Sunny Reed hide caption

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Courtesy of Sunny Reed

Adoptees express their fear, anger and insight on race during social unrest

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TK splatchcock turkey Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan hide caption

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Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan

This Thanksgiving, let science help you roast a tastier turkey

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Lauren Barber stands in her home in Columbus, Ohio, on Nov. 16. Barber has been inundated with offers from investors and companies that want to buy her house. She sometimes gets called or texted more than five times a day with offers. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Hey, I want to buy your house: Homeowners besieged by unsolicited offers

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Kim Hawley and her father Jim Scherman nap on the couch in 1993. It can be helpful to start your interview with a warm-up question, such as sharing a favorite memory from childhood. Photograph by Gee Scherman; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photograph by Gee Scherman; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR

Every family has stories to tell. Here's how to document yours

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Victoria Sur José Luis Martínez hide caption

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José Luis Martínez

Victoria Sur nets a Latin Grammy nomination with airy lullabies she wrote for her kids

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Emily Oster: Why wasn't the US tracking the spread of COVID-19 in schools?

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Children's book 'Calvin' shows how a community can embrace a trans child's identity

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Daylight saving time just ended. These tips can help rebuild your kid's sleep routine

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JaShyah Moore, 14, of East Orange, N.J., was last seen on Oct. 14 at Poppies Deli. Authorities from various law enforcement agencies in New Jersey are working together to try to find her. East Orange City Hall hide caption

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East Orange City Hall

A 10-year-old high-fives pharmacist Colleen Teevan after he received the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for kids at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Conn., on Tuesday. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Birthday parties and sleepovers are back as parents welcome COVID vaccine for kids

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Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

Housing and COVID: Why helping people pay rent can help fight the pandemic

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One thing I know now that I didn't three years ago: If we have kids together someday, it won't be their blood that makes them Wampanoag. Purestock/Getty Images hide caption

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Dole Fresh Vegetables, Inc. is voluntarily recalling a limited number of cases of garden salad due to a possible health risk from Listeria monocytogenes. The salad was sold in stores across 10 states nationwide. U.S. Food & Drug Administration hide caption

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U.S. Food & Drug Administration

A person receives a bandage after their first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a mobile vaccination clinic during a back to school event in August. Vaccines could be available for kids ages 5 to 11 as early as next week. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Are you planning on vaccinating your kids against COVID-19?

Children ages 5 to 11 could be able to get vaccines as early as next week. NPR would like to hear from parents who are planning to vaccinate their kids and those who are not for an upcoming story.