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Many Americans are mourning the loss of Thanksgiving traditions due to the coronavirus pandemic, such as family gatherings. But some are seeking new rituals to mark the holiday. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Families And Friends Mourn Loss Of Thanksgiving Traditions, Seek New Ones

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Students attend class wearing face masks in Antibes, France, on Nov. 2. At the end of October, France returned to a partial national lockdown to stem a surge in coronavirus cases. Meanwhile, schools remain open. Serge Haouzi/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Serge Haouzi/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Couples are struggling to redefine their own roles as they look to navigate a pandemic that has upended many aspects of domestic life. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

'I Come Up Short Every Day': Couples Under Strain As Families Are Stuck At Home

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Will Station, a vice president at Boeing, with his wife April, and children, Jaden and Taylor, on Saturday, Nov. 8, 2020, near their home in Newcastle, Wash. During the pandemic, Station has put in more hours at home and is spending more time with his family. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

'I'm A Much Better Cook': For Dads, Being Forced To Stay At Home Is Eye-Opening

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A Michigan couple whose large family attracted attention by growing to include 14 sons welcomed their first daughter nearly three decades after the birth of their first child. Maggie Schwandt was born Thursday, Nov. 5 at a hospital in Grand Rapids, Mich. Jay Schwandt/AP hide caption

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Jay Schwandt/AP

A child bride, age 14, participated in wedding rituals in a Hindu temple in India's Madhya Pradesh state in 2017. An estimated 1.5 million underage girls marry each year in India, according to the United Nations. The pandemic appears to be causing a spike in numbers. Prakash Hatvalne/AP hide caption

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Prakash Hatvalne/AP

Child Marriages Are Up In The Pandemic. Here's How India Tries To Stop Them

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Xavier, a fifth grader, shows his teacher Raisa Luna Guzmán the comic book he made for his virtual language arts class. Movimiento Cosecha/Ann Arbor Community Learning Center hide caption

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Movimiento Cosecha/Ann Arbor Community Learning Center

In Michigan, Undocumented Immigrants Form Learning Pod So They Won't Lose Their Jobs

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Nicole Xu for NPR

The American Government Once Offered Widely Affordable Child Care ... 77 Years Ago

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Passengers queue at the American Airlines counter at Ronald Reagan National Airport on Sept. 17. Coronavirus cases are surging across the country as the holiday season approaches, leaving many families with questions about traveling to gather together. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

As COVID-19 Cases Climb, How Safe Is It To Go Home For The Holidays?

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Ellen Griffin is a single mom with two kids in Birmingham, Ala. Tamika Moore for NPR hide caption

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Tamika Moore for NPR

'Incredibly Scary': Single Moms Fear Falling Through Holes In Pandemic Safety Net

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Marissa Tuping, a rural midwife, and Risa Calibuso, right, arrive in Nueva Vizcaya Provincial Hospital on July 21. Calibuso gave birth to her son moments later. Xyza Cruz Bacani For NPR hide caption

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Xyza Cruz Bacani For NPR

More than 1,000,000 Americans left the workforce in September. About 80% of them were women. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

Women are dropping out of the workforce in much higher numbers than men. Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute explains that women are overrepresented in jobs that have been hit hardest by the pandemic and child care has gotten harder to come by.

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

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Emily Oster Dana Smith/Dana Smith hide caption

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Dana Smith/Dana Smith

Opening Schools And Other Hard Decisions

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npr_brand2018_345 Allison Shelley/NPR hide caption

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Allison Shelley/NPR

Mary Louise Kelly: How A Veteran Radio Journalist Adapts To Hearing Loss

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From left: Sawsan al-Ramemi of Amman, Jordan, is a mom of two — and expecting her third child. Her husband is working in the U.S. Nienke Pastoor of the Netherlands has been juggling her job as a dairy farmer and helping her four teenagers with their online schoolwork. Jessica Barrera of Eau Claire, Wis., is finding ways to spread joy with her son, Niko, who's a virtual student these days. Nadia Bseiso, Julia Gunther and Lauren Justice for NPR hide caption

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Nadia Bseiso, Julia Gunther and Lauren Justice for NPR

From left: Deng Ge is a rap mogul who became a lockdown activist. Poet Sally Wen Mao Mao uses her art to express her anger about how Chinese people are being portrayed in the pandemic. Writer and comic artist Laura Gao, living in the U.S., has a video chat with her grandmother Zhou Nai, who's happy to have a supply of mooncakes, a popular Chinese dessert. Image provided by Deng Ge; Yuri Hasegawa; and screen grab by Laura Gao. hide caption

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Image provided by Deng Ge; Yuri Hasegawa; and screen grab by Laura Gao.

Dina el-Harazy and Adham Bagory were married in a private garden in Cairo, Egypt. Angel Miles teaches 5th graders for a D.C. public school. She worries about her students and herself during the pandemic. Figure skater Gian-Quen Isaacs practices at a rink in Cape Town, South Africa. The 15-year-old skater is holding fast to her Olympic dreams. Sima Diab, Dee Dwyer and Samatha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Sima Diab, Dee Dwyer and Samatha Reinders for NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend's apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Homeless Families Struggle With Impossible Choices As School Closures Continue

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Alvin Irby speaks at TED Residency Salon, November 28, 2017, New York, NY. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Alvin Irby: How Can We Inspire Children To Be Lifelong Readers?

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Courtesy of TEDxBoulder

Ash Beckham: What Can We Learn From Uncomfortable Moments?

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