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You can do a lot of things with minimal risk after being vaccinated. Although our public health expert says that maybe it's not quite time for a rave or other tightly packed events. Above: Fans take photographs of Megan Thee Stallion at a London show in 2019. Ollie Millington/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollie Millington/Getty Images

Ezhil Arasi (left) and Ranjith Kumar. The pandemic kept her from her pregnancy checkups. Their baby was born with an intestinal blockage that required surgery and died during the procedure. Doctors told Ranjith that if his wife had been examined regularly during her pregnancy, there could have been a different outcome. Ranjith Kumar hide caption

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Ranjith Kumar
Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Wajahat Ali: Can Investing In Children Revitalize Economies And Our Humanity?

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Jasmina Tomic/Jasmina Tomic / TED

Guy Winch: How Can We Maintain Healthy Boundaries Between Our Work And Personal Time?

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The Texas Supreme Court has allowed an emergency order to expire. Housing groups warn that this could result in thousands of people losing their homes to eviction. Tenants' rights advocates, like those pictured here in Boston, have pushed for stronger protections for renters during the pandemic. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Texas Courts Open Eviction Floodgates: 'We Just Stepped Off A Cliff'

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A record low number of homes for sale is pushing up prices and making it harder for first-time buyers to afford homeownership. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

The Housing Market Is Wild Right Now — And It's Making Inequality Worse

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Experts say there are ways that family and friends can support people who may be contemplating suicide. Tara Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Tara Moore/Getty Images

A new study finds that COVID-19 vaccines produce effective levels of antibodies in pregnant and breastfeeding women. They may benefit babies as well. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Getty Images
Jasjyot Singh Hans for NPR

COVID-19 Lockdowns Have Been Hard On Youth Locked Up

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With More Women In State Office, Family Leave Policies Have Not Caught Up

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Erick M. Ramos for NPR

How To Talk — And Listen — To A Teen With Mental Health Struggles

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LA Johnson/NPR

New Data Highlight Disparities In Students Learning In Person

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Pregnancy is a time of hope and dreams for most women and their families — even during a pandemic. Still, their extra need to avoid catching the coronavirus has meant more isolation and sacrifices, too. Leo Patrizi/Getty Images hide caption

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Leo Patrizi/Getty Images

Pregnant In A Pandemic: 'COVID Couldn't Rob Us Of Everything'

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Landlord Stephanie Graves walks to the main office at one of her properties in Houston with a resident. She's going door to door offering to help residents apply for rental assistance money approved by Congress that's just starting to flow to landlords and tenants. Stephanie Graves hide caption

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Stephanie Graves

Landlords Struggling To Stay Afloat See Lifeline In COVID-19 Relief For Renters

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The relief money that's going toward Mississippi child care will serve 80% of children who qualify for support, up from 28%, says Carol Burnett, head of the Mississippi Low-Income Child Care Initiative. MHJ/Getty Images hide caption

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MHJ/Getty Images

Relief Money Could More Than Double Support For Child Care Needs In Mississippi

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Sacramento's Elmhurst neighborhood is comprised of mostly single-family homes. The City Council has voted on a draft plan to allow fourplexes in all residential areas. Erin Baldassari/KQED hide caption

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Erin Baldassari/KQED

Facing Housing Crunch, California Cities Rethink Single-Family Neighborhoods

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President Biden signs the American Rescue Plan in the Oval Office of the White House on Thursday. Included in the plan is a monthly allowance for many American families that could be a potential financial-life-changer. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

How Biden's Plan Could Help Reshape The Finances Of American Families

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Kendra Mendoza's son, Joshua, has cerebral palsy. She says he loves school, but got little of the therapy he needed this spring. Scott Alario for NPR hide caption

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Scott Alario for NPR

A British newspaper flutters in the wind outside Buckingham Palace in London the day after the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's interview with Oprah Winfrey. Ian West/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Ian West/PA Images via Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

What The $300 A Month Child Benefit Could Mean For A Family On The Edge

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