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Fine Art

Dans la tour (In the Tower)/Self-Portrait of Leonor Fini with Constantin Jelenski, 1952, oil on canvas © Estate of Leonor Fini, Courtesy Galerie Minsky & Weinstein Gallery hide caption

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© Estate of Leonor Fini, Courtesy Galerie Minsky & Weinstein Gallery

'She was a pure creator.' The art world rediscovers Surrealist painter Leonor Fini

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Palestinians search the destroyed annex of the Church of Saint Porphyrius, damaged in a strike on Gaza City on Oct. 20. Dawood Nemer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dawood Nemer/AFP via Getty Images

More than 100 Gaza heritage sites have been damaged or destroyed by Israeli attacks

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An attendee views one of rising artist Adulphina Imuede's dreamlike illustrations at ART X. Manny Jefferson for NPR hide caption

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Manny Jefferson for NPR

Africa's flourishing art scene is a smash hit at Art X

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Artist Kelly McKernan in their studio in Nashville, Tenn. 2023. Nick Pettit hide caption

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Nick Pettit

New tools help artists fight AI by directly disrupting the systems

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The artists, brothers Adam and Zack Khalil and Jackson Polys, are part of the collective the New Red Order. They call it a "public secret society." Here they are with Creative Time curator Diya Vij. Keren Carrión/NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrión/NPR

An 'anti-World's Fair' makes its case: give land back to Native Americans

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White Cube, the London-based gallery that helped shape the Young British Artist movement, has opened its first permanent U.S. branch in New York. Nicholas Venezia/White Cube hide caption

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Nicholas Venezia/White Cube

London's White Cube shows 'fresh and new' art at first New York gallery

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The artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons is one of this year's MacArthur fellows. Her sculptures, paintings, installations and photography are displayed in over 30 museums around the globe. When she got news of the so-called "genius grant," she says, " I was running room to room in the house, feeling a sense of terror and elation." MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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MacArthur Foundation

Curfew (Likoni March 27 2020) by Kenyan-British painter Michael Armitage, was inspired by an attack on ferry passengers by paramilitary police in Nairobi. The painting hangs in the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Jonathan Muzikar/The Museum of Modern Art, New York hide caption

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Jonathan Muzikar/The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Susanna and the Elders, painted by Artemisia Gentileschi, is seen here in its before-conservation condition; seen through infrared reflectography; and in its restored state. Royal Collection Trust / © His Majesty King Charles III 2023 hide caption

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Royal Collection Trust / © His Majesty King Charles III 2023

A woman stands in front of an blank canvas hung up at the Kunsten Museum in Aalborg, Denmark, in 2021. Danish artist Jens Haaning sent the museum blank canvasses under the title Take the Money and Run. Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Colombian painter and sculptor Fernando Botero poses inside the "Tren de La Cultura" ("Train of Culture"), during a news conference for the exhibition "Fernando Botero: The Circus," in Medellín, Colombia, Jan. 30, 2015. Fredy Builes/Reuters hide caption

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Fredy Builes/Reuters
Malaka Gharib/ NPR

Want to 'feel something' when you look at art? Try these 6 tips

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James Abbott McNeill Whistler's famous 1871 oil on canvas was actually conceived as "an experiment in color." It's called Arrangement in Gray and Black No.1: Portrait of the Artist's Mother. Jean Schormans/RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource NY hide caption

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Jean Schormans/RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource NY

When Whistler's model didn't show up, his mom stepped in — and made art history

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Mahsa Amini peers out from a mural by Rodrigo Pradel that covers an entire building side in a Washington, D.C. alley. Amini's death in police custody in Iran last year led to protests and a revolutionary movement. Rodrigo Pradel hide caption

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Rodrigo Pradel

Russell Craig, "Cognitive Thinking," 2023. Courtesy of the artist and Ford Foundation Gallery hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist and Ford Foundation Gallery

From prison to art gallery, former inmates take center stage

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Installation view of the No Justice Without Love exhibition at the Ford Foundation Gallery in New York. Ford Foundation Gallery/Sebastian Bach hide caption

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Ford Foundation Gallery/Sebastian Bach

From prison to art gallery, former inmates take center stage

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Artist Francoise Gilot appears during an interview with Reginald Bosanquet in London on March 3, 1965, in connection with the publication of her book, My Life With Picasso. Bob Dear/AP hide caption

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Bob Dear/AP

Keith Haring at his Pop Shop in SoHo, 1986 Tseng Kwong Chi / Muna Tseng Dance Projects Inc./The Keith Haring Foundation hide caption

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Tseng Kwong Chi / Muna Tseng Dance Projects Inc./The Keith Haring Foundation

An exhibition of Keith Haring's art and activism makes clear: 'Art is for everybody'

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