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Fine Art

Ownership of "Statue of a Victorious Youth," a bronze sculpture of ancient Greek origin, is being disputed. An American museum is trying to keep it. Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program. hide caption

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Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

Tom Schiller plays artist Kurt Barnert, a character modeled on Gerhard Richter, in this old-fashioned melodrama from writer-director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Sony Pictures Classics

An image shows the paintings stolen from the Netherlands' Kunsthal museum in 2012 — including Picasso's Tête d'Arlequin at bottom right. Two Dutch citizens claim to have found the missing Picasso work, Romanian prosecutors said on Sunday. Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images

Art activist and cultural curator Kimberly Drew. Mia Fermindoza /Courtesy Kimberly Drew hide caption

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Mia Fermindoza /Courtesy Kimberly Drew

Kimberly Drew On Making Art Radically Accessible For All

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Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo (center) cleans a spill on the floor during the pre-inauguration of her peace monument titled Fragmentos (Fragments), for which she used metal melted-down from the weapons handed over by FARC guerrilla fighters to make the floor, in Bogotá on July 31. Diana Sanchez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Diana Sanchez/AFP/Getty Images

Abstract artist Larry Poons is enjoying a late-career resurgence of interest, decades after his optical dot paintings attracted acclaim in the 1960s. Poons is a key figure in the documentary The Price of Everything. HBO Documentary Films hide caption

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HBO Documentary Films

New Documentary Paints A Picture Of The Contemporary Art Market Run Amok

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Mark Bradford says he wanted his Spoiled Foot installation to make the viewer feel "as if the center of the room was no longer available." Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth hide caption

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Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth

Memory Fuels Art And Activism In Mark Bradford's 'Tomorrow Is Another Day'

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Sophie Calle, at a private concert by Pharrell Williams in Paris on May 26, 2014. Pharrell contributed to the album Souris Calle, in tribute to Sophie Calle's dead cat. Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty Images

Titus Kaphar often appropriates familiar styles from the Western art canon, but his paintings and sculptures alter the images to point out hidden histories of racism and slavery. John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Meet The MacArthur Fellow Disrupting Racism In Art

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Corot's mother was a milliner and his father was a textile merchant — he paints many of his models in elaborate costumes. He made Jewish Woman of Algeria in 1870. Private Collection, Courtesy National Gallery of Art hide caption

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Private Collection, Courtesy National Gallery of Art

At The End Of His Career, This 19th Century Artist Painted As He Pleased

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In 1897, Belgian King Leopold brought 267 Congolese people to his country estate to display them in a mock African village — a practice referred to as a human zoo. Alphonse Gautier/RMCA, Tervuren hide caption

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Alphonse Gautier/RMCA, Tervuren

Arleene Correa Valencia works on a painting in her latest series: In Times of Crisis, En Tiempo de Crisis. Rachael Bongiorno for NPR hide caption

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Rachael Bongiorno for NPR

After The Wildfires: Artist Captures Plight Of Napa's Undocumented Workers

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Artist Sam Gilliam is known for his vibrant, draped fabrics such as Swing from 1969. Smithsonian American Art Museum hide caption

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Smithsonian American Art Museum

Hard At Work At 84, Artist Sam Gilliam Has 'Never Felt Better'

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From March 4 to September 3, conservator Chris Stavroudis is part of the exhibition Jackson Pollock's Number 1, 1949: A Conservation Treatment at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles hide caption

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Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

A Jackson Pollock Painting Gets A Touch-Up — And The Public's Invited To Watch

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