Fine Art Fine Art

Fine Art

A Vhils work at La Condition Publique in Roubaix, in northern France, in March 2017. Philippe Huguen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Philippe Huguen/AFP via Getty Images

The Rodin Museum in Paris is selling sculptures to pay the bills — and that's exactly as the artist intended. When he died in 1917, Auguste Rodin left the museum plaster casts for just this purpose. Above, The Thinker (Le Penseur) is pictured ahead of the Musée Rodin's reopening in November 2015. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images

Good Thinking: How Rodin Ensured The Financial Future Of His Paris Museum

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/900006469/900603891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Jennifer Steinkamp's digital animations, trees gradually change color, lose leaves, sprout new leaves, grow flowers, and drop petals to the ground. She's done a series of such trees in honor of teachers who've had a profound influence on her. Jennifer Steinkamp/Lehmann Maupin hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Steinkamp/Lehmann Maupin

Es Devlin speaks at TED2019: Bigger Than Us. April 15 - 19, 2019. Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED hide caption

toggle caption
Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Es Devlin: How Do Spaces Shape Our Memories And Experiences?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/894687458/895030490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alfredo Ramos Martínez was regarded as a Father of Mexican Modernism, but his name is not widely known in the U.S. Above is Flores Mexicanas, a painting he worked on for 15 years. Dallas Museum of Art hide caption

toggle caption
Dallas Museum of Art

Visitors wearing face masks wait to see the Mona Lisa at the Louvre Museum on Monday. The most visited museum in the world reopened to the public after closing in March. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chesnot/Getty Images

Boston officials have decided to remove the sculpture Emancipation Monument which has stood in Park Square since 1879. It depicts a formerly enslaved man kneeling before Abraham Lincoln. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR
Nikkolas Smith

'Artivist' Nikkolas Smith Combines Art And Activism Into A Singular Superpower

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/883490848/884958718" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The name Rumors of War is from a biblical passage Matthew 24:6: "You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come." Travis Fullerton/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Fullerton/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla., didn't let COVID-19 stop it from showcasing its "Midnight in Paris" exhibition. Above, the Spanish surrealist painter in 1964. Terry Fincher/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Terry Fincher/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Artist Christo Vladimirov Javacheff attends the presentation of his installation The Floating Piers on June 16, 2016, in Sulzano, Italy. He died Sunday at age 84. Pier Marco Tacca/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pier Marco Tacca/Getty Images

"She's challenging you to sit down in that chair," Los Angeles artist Alison Saar says of her 2019 sculpture, Set to Simmer. Jeff McLane/L.A. Louver hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff McLane/L.A. Louver

'She's Challenging You': Alison Saar's Sculptures Speak To Race, Beauty, Power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/851769833/854363963" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Metropolitan Museum on Mar. 13, the first day it was closed due to the coronavirus. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Ivo Faber/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/Matthew Marks Gallery

With Surprising Sculptures, Katharina Fritsch Makes The Familiar Fun

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/824445613/838297705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, photographed in New York on Aug. 19, 2007. The artist, best known for their work in the groups Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV, died on March 14, 2020. Neville Elder/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Neville Elder/Redferns/Getty Images

The "Hearts of Our People" exhibition is devoted entirely to the art of Native American women past and present. Above, Náhookǫsjí Hai (Winter in the North)/Biboon Giiwedinong (It Is Winter in the North) by D.Y. Begay (Navajo), 2018, wool and natural dyes. Addison Doty/Minneapolis Institute of Art hide caption

toggle caption
Addison Doty/Minneapolis Institute of Art

'Making Is About Our Survival': Exhibition Celebrates Artwork Of Native Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/812152212/813289017" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript