Fine Art Fine Art

Fine Art

Alfredo Ramos Martínez was regarded as a Father of Mexican Modernism, but his name is not widely known in the U.S. Above is Flores Mexicanas, a painting he worked on for 15 years. Dallas Museum of Art hide caption

toggle caption
Dallas Museum of Art

Visitors wearing face masks wait to see the Mona Lisa at the Louvre Museum on Monday. The most visited museum in the world reopened to the public after closing in March. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chesnot/Getty Images

Boston officials have decided to remove the sculpture Emancipation Monument which has stood in Park Square since 1879. It depicts a formerly enslaved man kneeling before Abraham Lincoln. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR
Nikkolas Smith

'Artivist' Nikkolas Smith Combines Art And Activism Into A Singular Superpower

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/883490848/884958718" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The name Rumors of War is from a biblical passage Matthew 24:6: "You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come." Travis Fullerton/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Fullerton/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla., didn't let COVID-19 stop it from showcasing its "Midnight in Paris" exhibition. Above, the Spanish surrealist painter in 1964. Terry Fincher/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Terry Fincher/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Artist Christo Vladimirov Javacheff attends the presentation of his installation The Floating Piers on June 16, 2016, in Sulzano, Italy. He died Sunday at age 84. Pier Marco Tacca/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pier Marco Tacca/Getty Images

"She's challenging you to sit down in that chair," Los Angeles artist Alison Saar says of her 2019 sculpture, Set to Simmer. Jeff McLane/L.A. Louver hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff McLane/L.A. Louver

'She's Challenging You': Alison Saar's Sculptures Speak To Race, Beauty, Power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/851769833/854363963" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Metropolitan Museum on Mar. 13, the first day it was closed due to the coronavirus. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Ivo Faber/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/Matthew Marks Gallery

With Surprising Sculptures, Katharina Fritsch Makes The Familiar Fun

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/824445613/838297705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, photographed in New York on Aug. 19, 2007. The artist, best known for their work in the groups Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV, died on March 14, 2020. Neville Elder/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Neville Elder/Redferns/Getty Images

The "Hearts of Our People" exhibition is devoted entirely to the art of Native American women past and present. Above, Náhookǫsjí Hai (Winter in the North)/Biboon Giiwedinong (It Is Winter in the North) by D.Y. Begay (Navajo), 2018, wool and natural dyes. Addison Doty/Minneapolis Institute of Art hide caption

toggle caption
Addison Doty/Minneapolis Institute of Art

'Making Is About Our Survival': Exhibition Celebrates Artwork Of Native Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/812152212/813289017" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec's 1896 lithograph Woman Reclining — Waking Up from the portfolio Elles Norton Simon Museum hide caption

toggle caption
Norton Simon Museum

Get A Glimpse Of Labor, Leisure And Everyday Life In Paris' Belle Époque

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/809631184/809884931" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eric Tucker painted the everyday people in his hometown of Warrington, England — like this smoker in a pub. Tony Longmore hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Longmore

'Unseen Artist' Eric Tucker Spent Decades Painting — But Nobody Knew

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/808101867/808404941" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology — known as The Penn Museum — has hired refugees and immigrants from the Middle East, Africa and Central America as part of their "Global Guides" program. Moumena Saradar, who is originally from Syria, stands next to the wedding jewelry and headdress of Queen Puabi, her favorite part of the Middle East gallery. Cameron Pollack for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Pollack for NPR

Refugee Docents Help Bring A Museum's Global Collection To Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/795920834/806729424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Years ago, John Sonsini began approaching men in Los Angeles who were looking for work — and offering them modeling jobs. The results are on view in a show called Cowboy Stories & New Paintings. Above, Saul & Lorenzo, 2008. John Sonsini hide caption

toggle caption
John Sonsini

Artist Says His Portraits Of Day Laborers Are Paintings — Not Statements

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/804591711/805537162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript