Fine Art Fine Art

Mark Bradford says he wanted his Spoiled Foot installation to make the viewer feel "as if the center of the room was no longer available." Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth hide caption

toggle caption
Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth

Memory Fuels Art And Activism In Mark Bradford's 'Tomorrow Is Another Day'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657517100/658721738" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sophie Calle, at a private concert by Pharrell Williams in Paris on May 26, 2014. Pharrell contributed to the album Souris Calle, in tribute to Sophie Calle's dead cat. Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty Images

Titus Kaphar often appropriates familiar styles from the Western art canon, but his paintings and sculptures alter the images to point out hidden histories of racism and slavery. John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

toggle caption
John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Meet The MacArthur Fellow Disrupting Racism In Art

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/654476095/654518543" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Corot's mother was a milliner and his father was a textile merchant — he paints many of his models in elaborate costumes. He made Jewish Woman of Algeria in 1870. Private Collection, Courtesy National Gallery of Art hide caption

toggle caption
Private Collection, Courtesy National Gallery of Art

At The End Of His Career, This 19th Century Artist Painted As He Pleased

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653704714/653902803" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 1897, Belgian King Leopold brought 267 Congolese people to his country estate to display them in a mock African village — a practice referred to as a human zoo. Alphonse Gautier/RMCA, Tervuren hide caption

toggle caption
Alphonse Gautier/RMCA, Tervuren

Arleene Correa Valencia works on a painting in her latest series: In Times of Crisis, En Tiempo de Crisis. Rachael Bongiorno for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rachael Bongiorno for NPR

After The Wildfires: Artist Captures Plight Of Napa's Undocumented Workers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/642656221/643922060" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Artist Sam Gilliam is known for his vibrant, draped fabrics such as Swing from 1969. Smithsonian American Art Museum hide caption

toggle caption
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Hard At Work At 84, Artist Sam Gilliam Has 'Never Felt Better'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/640903173/643218478" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From March 4 to September 3, conservator Chris Stavroudis is part of the exhibition Jackson Pollock's Number 1, 1949: A Conservation Treatment at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

A Jackson Pollock Painting Gets A Touch-Up — And The Public's Invited To Watch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634309516/635908005" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Toronto Police Service released this image of the Banksy print Trolley Hunters, apparently stolen from an exhibit Sunday. Banksy/Toronto Police Service hide caption

toggle caption
Banksy/Toronto Police Service

Claudia "CLAW" Gold's trademark cartoon paw decorates a wall at "Beyond the Streets," an L.A. exhibition that celebrates street art. Beau Roulette/Courtesy of Beyond The Streets hide caption

toggle caption
Beau Roulette/Courtesy of Beyond The Streets

Alberto Giacometti didn't sculpt heroes on horseback; he depicted everyday humans — and animals — struggling to get through the day. Above, his 1951 bronze sculpture Dog (Le chien). Cathy Carver/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden/Smithsonian hide caption

toggle caption
Cathy Carver/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden/Smithsonian

Giacometti's Sculptures Bare The Scars Of Our Daily Struggles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617638893/618163043" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a secret room located in Florence's church of San Lorenzo the walls are covered in drawings believed to be the work of Michelangelo and his disciples. Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

This Room Is Thought To Have Been Michelangelo's Secret Hideaway And Drawing Board

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615181742/617676421" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One of Andy Warhol's Oxidation Paintings, sold earlier this week by the Baltimore Museum of Art. Mito Hood/Photography BMA hide caption

toggle caption
Mito Hood/Photography BMA

Baltimore Museum Says Goodbye Warhol, Hello Younger, More Diverse Collection

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612402777/612584001" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript