Fine Art Fine Art

The Panama Papers may help settle an ownership claim over Amedeo Modigliani's Seated Man With a Cane, which Philippe Maestracci says was seized from his grandfather by the Nazis. Christie's Images/Corbis hide caption

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Christie's Images/Corbis

Panama Papers Provide Rare Glimpse Inside Famously Opaque Art Market

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Workers tend a garden in Gomez's 2015 Jardín no 1. © Ramiro Gomez/Courtesy of Abrams hide caption

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© Ramiro Gomez/Courtesy of Abrams

Gardens Don't Tend Themselves: Portraits Of The People Behind LA's Luxury

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A "new" Rembrandt portrait is actually the creation of a 3-D printer — and a statistical analysis of 346 paintings by the Dutch master. Robert Harrison/J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam hide caption

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Robert Harrison/J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam

A 'New' Rembrandt: From The Frontiers Of AI And Not The Artist's Atelier

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In Eugène Delacroix's 1827 lithograph, Mephistopheles Aloft, 1827, a demon flies over a dark city. Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco/The J. Paul Getty Museum hide caption

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Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco/The J. Paul Getty Museum

For 19th Century French Artists, 'Noir' Was The New Black

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An interior view of the fictional Selig family's house. Here, in the kitchen, a portal — one of many — leads out of the house into the otherworldly beyond. Lindsey Kennedy/Courtesy of Meow Wolf hide caption

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Lindsey Kennedy/Courtesy of Meow Wolf

DIY Artists Paint The Town Strange, With Some Help From George R.R. Martin

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In his barn, Bertoia would play his sculptures for small invited audiences, or by himself late at night. His sculptures are in the barn where he left them when he died in 1978. John Brien/Important Records hide caption

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John Brien/Important Records

Sound Sculptor Harry Bertoia Created Musical, Meditative Art

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"Satellite imagery allows us to ... record information in different parts of the light spectrum ... that we simply cannot see with our human eyes." — Sarah Parcak Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/TED

How Can Satellite Images Unlock Secrets To Our Hidden Past?

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A sandstone statue of Rishabhanata, from Rajasthan or Madhya Pradesh, India, in the 10th century A.D., flanked by a pair of attendants. It is valued at approximately $150,000. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement hide caption

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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Visitor Services Associate Sacha Baumann talks with two visitors about Mark Bradford's 2006 work Scorched Earth. Ben Gibbs Photography/The Broad Art Foundation hide caption

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Ben Gibbs Photography/The Broad Art Foundation

Avant Guard: At LA's Broad Museum, A New Approach To Protecting Art

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Object (or Luncheon in Fur), by Meret Oppenheim. In 1936, Oppenheim wrapped a teacup, saucer and spoon in fur. In the age of Freud, a gastro-sexual interpretation was inescapable. Even today, the work triggers intense reactions. Flavia Brandi/Flickr hide caption

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Flavia Brandi/Flickr

Saudi artist Abdulnasser Gharem poses in front of "Generation Kill," a piece made with rubber stamps, digital print and paint, at the opening night of his exhibition titled Al Sahwa (The Awakening) at Ayyam gallery in Dubai in 2014. Aya Batrawy/AP hide caption

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Aya Batrawy/AP

A New Generation Of Saudi Artists Pushes The Boundaries

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Art World Captivated By 'Fake Rothko' Trial

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Campbell Jeff McLane/LA Louver hide caption

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Jeff McLane/LA Louver

Portraits Of LA's Female Artists Send A Powerful Message: 'You Are Here'

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