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Fine Art

Artist Sam Gilliam is known for his vibrant, draped fabrics such as Swing from 1969. Smithsonian American Art Museum hide caption

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Smithsonian American Art Museum

Hard At Work At 84, Artist Sam Gilliam Has 'Never Felt Better'

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From March 4 to September 3, conservator Chris Stavroudis is part of the exhibition Jackson Pollock's Number 1, 1949: A Conservation Treatment at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles hide caption

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Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

A Jackson Pollock Painting Gets A Touch-Up — And The Public's Invited To Watch

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Art's 'Sense Of Humor' Chronicled At The National Gallery Of Art

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The Toronto Police Service released this image of the Banksy print Trolley Hunters, apparently stolen from an exhibit Sunday. Banksy/Toronto Police Service hide caption

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Banksy/Toronto Police Service

Claudia "CLAW" Gold's trademark cartoon paw decorates a wall at "Beyond the Streets," an L.A. exhibition that celebrates street art. Beau Roulette/Courtesy of Beyond The Streets hide caption

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Beau Roulette/Courtesy of Beyond The Streets

Alberto Giacometti didn't sculpt heroes on horseback; he depicted everyday humans — and animals — struggling to get through the day. Above, his 1951 bronze sculpture Dog (Le chien). Cathy Carver/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden/Smithsonian hide caption

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Cathy Carver/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden/Smithsonian

Giacometti's Sculptures Bare The Scars Of Our Daily Struggles

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In a secret room located in Florence's church of San Lorenzo the walls are covered in drawings believed to be the work of Michelangelo and his disciples. Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

This Room Is Thought To Have Been Michelangelo's Secret Hideaway And Drawing Board

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One of Andy Warhol's Oxidation Paintings, sold earlier this week by the Baltimore Museum of Art. Mito Hood/Photography BMA hide caption

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Mito Hood/Photography BMA

Baltimore Museum Says Goodbye Warhol, Hello Younger, More Diverse Collection

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Past Times by Kerry James Marshall at Sotheby's. It sold for $21.1 million, a record auction price for a living African American artist, this week. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

The Mother of Modern Medicine by Kadir Nelson, oil on linen, 2017. Collection of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery and National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from Kadir Nelson and the JKBN Group LLC. hide caption

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Collection of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery and National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from Kadir Nelson and the JKBN Group LLC.

Henrietta Lacks' Lasting Impact Detailed In New Portrait

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Film director Jean Renoir grappled with his father's legacy. "I have spent my life trying to determine the extent of the influence of my father upon me," he wrote. Renoir is shown above filming his 1962 film, The Elusive Corporal. Agence France Presse/Getty Images hide caption

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Agence France Presse/Getty Images

Filmmaker Jean Renoir Inherited An Artist's Eye For Images

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