Fine Art Fine Art

Frances Glessner Lee, Red Bedroom, about 1944-48. Collection of the Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass./Courtesy of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Baltimore, Md. hide caption

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Collection of the Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass./Courtesy of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Baltimore, Md.

The Tiny, Murderous World Of Frances Glessner Lee

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Sale Of $450 Million Da Vinci Painting Serves As A Triumph Of Marketing

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A man stands in front of a projection of the virtually recomposed painting The Enchanted Pose by René Magritte at The Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium on Tuesday. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Why A Thumb-Sized Stone Is Important To Ancient Greek Art History

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eL Seed's artwork in Cape Town, South Africa Courtesy eL Seed hide caption

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Courtesy eL Seed

eL Seed: Can The Beauty Of Arabic Calligraphy Shift Perspectives?

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Favela Painting in Santa Marta favela of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Favela Painting/Barcroft Media hide caption

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Favela Painting/Barcroft Media

Dre Urhahn: How Can Public Art Projects Transform Rough Neighborhoods?

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Titus Kaphar on the TED stage Bret Hartman/TED hide caption

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Bret Hartman/TED

Titus Kaphar: How Can We Address Centuries of Racism In Art?

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Vincent Van Gogh's Olive Trees, made with oil on canvas in 1889. See the shadow cast by that small tree on the far right side? There's a grasshopper lurking in that shade. Courtesy of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art hide caption

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Courtesy of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Left: Johannes Vermeer's Lady Writing, 1665. Right: Caspar Netscher's Woman Feeding a Parrot, with a Page, 1666. National Gallery of Art, Washington hide caption

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National Gallery of Art, Washington

Dutch Artists Painted Their Patriotism With Pearls And ... Parrots?

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Phillips Collection curator Eliza Rathbone says Renoir was "at the height of his powers" when in he painted Luncheon of the Boating Party. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. hide caption

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The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

Guess Who Renoir Was In Love With In 'Luncheon Of The Boating Party'

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Why Da Vinci's Last Privately Owned Painting Probably Won't End Up In A Museum

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Christie's unveiled Leonardo da Vinci's Salvator Mundi at Christie's New York on Tuesday in New York City. Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Christie's Auction House hide caption

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Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Christie's Auction House

Benjamin Raphael of Nigeria (left) is a salesman who had never picked up a paint brush before he found asylum in Italy. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Painting Their Old Life Helps Them Build A New Life In Italy

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