Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

Shoppers who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program may find it harder to use their benefits to purchase fresh fruit and vegetables at farmers markets like this one in Minneapolis, Minn., while the goverment changes contractors. Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A McDonald's billboard in St. Paul, Minn., advertises in the Hmong language. A new study of first- and second-generation Hmong and Karen immigrants finds their gut microbiomes changed soon after moving to the U.S. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Food assistance recipients spend about 10 percent of their food budget on sugary drinks, while the rest of the population spends about 7 percent. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A New Prescription For Depression: Join A Team And Get Sweaty

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Allagash employees Salim Raal, left, and Brendan McKay stack bottles of Golden Brett, a limited release beer fermented with a house strain of Brettanomyces yeast. The Maine brewery recently installed solar panels as part of its sustainability initiatives. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Fried chicken and mac and cheese: A study suggests Southern cuisine may be at the center of a tangled web of reasons why black people in America are more prone to hypertension than white people. Robert Manella/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Manella/Getty Images

More kids are eating at fast-food chains like McDonald's, according to a new study, but parents are buying the healthier side options only about half the time. Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Because of a recent court decision, the size of the financial incentive your employer offers you in hopes of motivating you to lower your cholesterol or lose weight may soon shrink. Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images hide caption

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Molly Cranna/Refinery29/Getty Images

Yogurt selections like this one at a Los Angeles 365 by Whole Foods Market store are getting larger, but a new U.K. study warns that many contain lots of added sugar. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A World Food Programme convoy carries humanitarian aid to Aleppo, Syria. Getting food into conflict zones is a major hurdle — and a topic of discussion at the WFP's Innovation Accelerator. Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

If patients are obese, their physicians should refer them to behavior-based weight loss programs or offer their own, a national panel of experts says. Yet many doctors aren't having the necessary conversations with their patients. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images
Daniel Fishel for NPR

Food Safety Scares Are Up In 2018. Here's Why You Shouldn't Freak Out

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While many Americans only know one kind of pomegranate — the ruby red Wonderful — there are actually dozens of varieties with different flavor and heartiness profiles. Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside hide caption

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Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside

"I also learned that designated nursing spaces didn't exist until Nancy Pelosi became Speaker of the House in 2007. This story often repeats itself: multiple organizations have changed their breastfeeding policies in recent years, but only when women came into leadership roles." Ayumi Takahashi for NPR hide caption

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Ayumi Takahashi for NPR

"It shouldn't have happened," says Nicole Smith-Holt of Richfield, Minn., gazing at the death certificate of her son Alec Raeshawn Smith. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Insulin's High Cost Leads To Lethal Rationing

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The Food and Drug Administration says that a large body of research "does not support a cancer warning for coffee," a statement at odds with a California court ruling earlier this year. Daniel Augusto/Flickr hide caption

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Daniel Augusto/Flickr