Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

If patients are obese, their physicians should refer them to behavior-based weight loss programs or offer their own, a national panel of experts says. Yet many doctors aren't having the necessary conversations with their patients. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Fishel for NPR

Food Safety Scares Are Up In 2018. Here's Why You Shouldn't Freak Out

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While many Americans only know one kind of pomegranate — the ruby red Wonderful — there are actually dozens of varieties with different flavor and heartiness profiles. Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside hide caption

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Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside

"I also learned that designated nursing spaces didn't exist until Nancy Pelosi became Speaker of the House in 2007. This story often repeats itself: multiple organizations have changed their breastfeeding policies in recent years, but only when women came into leadership roles." Ayumi Takahashi for NPR hide caption

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Ayumi Takahashi for NPR

"It shouldn't have happened," says Nicole Smith-Holt of Richfield, Minn., gazing at the death certificate of her son Alec Raeshawn Smith. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Insulin's High Cost Leads To Lethal Rationing

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The Food and Drug Administration says that a large body of research "does not support a cancer warning for coffee," a statement at odds with a California court ruling earlier this year. Daniel Augusto/Flickr hide caption

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Daniel Augusto/Flickr

Vacation days piling up? Even a short trip can boost well-being. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Vacation Days Piling Up? Here's How To Get The Most Out Of A Short Vacation

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A small new study shows that successful dieters had an abundance of a bacteria called Phascolarctobacterium, whereas another bacteria, Dialister, was associated with a failure to lose weight. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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sorbetto/Getty Images

Diet Hit A Snag? Your Gut Bacteria May Be Partly To Blame

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With financial aid declining, many college students can't afford to eat, studies show, even though about 40 percent are also working. Nearly 1 in 4 college students are parents, which can add to their financial stress. franckreporter/Getty Images hide caption

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Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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RunPhoto/Getty Images

Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

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Pesto and pulled jackfruit tacos. In Southern California, working-class Mexican-American chefs are giving traditionally meaty dishes a vegan spin. Evi Oravecz/Green Evi/Picture Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Evi Oravecz/Green Evi/Picture Press/Getty Images

When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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A foal nurses from a mare at the Lindenhof Stud in Brandenburg, Germany. While mare's milk remains a niche product, its reputation as a health elixir is causing trouble for European producers in a more regulated age. Susanna Forrest/for NPR hide caption

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Susanna Forrest/for NPR

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

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The latest study to link coffee and longevity adds to a growing body of evidence that, far from a vice, the brew can be protective of good health. Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too

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Puerto Rican residents received food and water from FEMA after Hurricane Maria, but many complained that some boxes were stuffed with candy and salty snacks, not meals. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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A study finds light drinkers have the lowest combined risk of getting cancer and dying prematurely — lower than nondrinkers. Alcohol is estimated to be the third-largest contributor to overall cancer deaths. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Drinking Alcohol Can Raise Cancer Risk. How Much Is Too Much?

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Rice within the octagon in this field is part of an experiment to grow rice under different levels of carbon dioxide. Toshihiro Hasegawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan hide caption

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Toshihiro Hasegawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan

As Carbon Dioxide Levels Rise, Major Crops Are Losing Nutrients

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