Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

A menu board shows calorie counts hangs at a Starbucks in New York City. The FDA had previously halted the roll out of rules requiring chain restaurants and other food establishments to post calories on menus. Now, the agency says the rules will be in place by May 2018. Candice Choi/AP hide caption

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Candice Choi/AP

Scientists have used a new gene-editing technique to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat. Infrared pictures of 6-month-old pigs taken at zero, two, and four hours after cold exposure show that the pigs' thermoregulation was improved after insertion of the new gene. The modified pigs are on the right side of the images. Zheng et al. / PNAS hide caption

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Zheng et al. / PNAS

CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs

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The foods on the left contain naturally occurring fibers that are intrinsic in plants. The foods on the right contain isolated fibers, such as chicory root, which are extracted and added to processed foods. The FDA will determine whether added fibers can count as dietary fiber on nutrition facts labels. Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Carolyn Rogers/NPR

The FDA Will Decide Whether 26 Ingredients Count As Fiber

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Val Olson (from left), Rick Kamm, Steve David and Dee Haskins play up to the net during a pickleball game at Monument Valley Park in Colorado Springs, Colo., in 2011. Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images

Age-Defying Athletes May Provide Clues For The Rest Of Us

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Roughly 80 percent of all first strokes arise from risks that people can influence with behavioral changes, doctors say — risks like high blood pressure, smoking and drug abuse. Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images

In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration sent an advisory about an outbreak of listeria linked to cantaloupes killed 33 people. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP

FDA Not Doing Enough To Fix Serious Food Safety Violations, Report Finds

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Panera's CEO has challenged other fast-food CEOs to eat their kids' menus for a week. He's trying to start a conversation about the nutrition in these meals. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

More Healthful Kids Meals? Panera CEO Dishes Out A Challenge

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Food allergies are tricky to diagnose, and many kids can outgrow them, too. A test called an oral food challenge is the gold standard to rule out an allergy. It's performed under medical supervision. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

This Test Can Determine Whether You've Outgrown A Food Allergy

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Dorothy Boddie runs the outreach ministry at Allen Chapel AME, one of the Capital Area Food Bank's nonprofit partners. The D.C.-area food bank is part of a growing trend to move toward healthier options in food assistance, because many in the population it serves suffer from high blood pressure and diabetes. Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank hide caption

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Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank

Michael Jacobson (right) and Bonnie Liebman, CSPI's director of nutrition, launching a campaign against over-salted food in the late 1970s. Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest

A Pioneer Of Food Activism Steps Down, Looks Back

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Get Off The Couch Baby Boomers, Or You May Not Be Able To Later

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Ben Hansen (left) watches data on a hand-held device as Pittsburgh Pirates prospect Matt Benedict throws a ball. Benedict is wearing sensors that recorded 39 sets of measurements. Tamara Lush/AP hide caption

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Tamara Lush/AP

What's Up Those Baseball Sleeves? Lots Of Data, And Privacy Concerns

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