Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

Palestinian people with empty bowls wait for food at a donation point in Rafah. A report out this week shows widespread hunger and malnutrition in Gaza but stopped short of declaring it a "famine." Abed Rahim Khatib/Anadolu via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Abed Rahim Khatib/Anadolu via Getty Images

The packaging on Kool brand's "non-menthol" cigarettes and its existing menthols are very similar. Anti-smoking activists argue this is a way to get around any ban on menthol cigarettes by appealing to consumers who like to smoke menthols. Stanford Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Stanford Medicine

With a federal menthol ban looming, tobacco companies push 'non-menthol' substitutes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239780337/1239814890" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ultra-processed foods contain substances you wouldn't find in your own kitchen, like high-fructose corn syrup, artificial flavor and color enhancers, anti-caking agents and emulsifiers. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

From anxiety to cancer, the evidence against ultra-processed food piles up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238939706/1239107326" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Isabela Oside, 45, washes hands of her daughter Faith, 3, who completed doses through the worlds first malaria vaccine. Malaria is one of the preventable diseases that contributes to worldwide child mortality. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

Why a new report on child mortality is historic, encouraging — and grim

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238295742/1238332307" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Strength training is good for everyone, but women who train regularly get a significantly higher boost in longevity than men. Gary Yeowell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Yeowell/Getty Images

Women who do strength training live longer. How much is enough?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1236791784/1237398118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People with metabolic syndrome, which can include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugar and several other conditions, are at higher risk of getting cancer, a new study finds. Oscar Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oscar Wong/Getty Images

How high blood sugar, hypertension and obesity can add up to cancer risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1237152025/1237398130" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A plant-based diet is not just good for your health, it's good for the planet. Alexander Spatari/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Spatari/Getty Images

This diet swap can cut your carbon footprint and boost longevity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1234460368/1235731993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This tuna, chickpea and parmesan salad bowl packs a protein punch, which is crucial for building muscle strength. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Aubrey/NPR

Millions of women are 'under-muscled.' These foods help build strength

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231552773/1239188706" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tai chi has many health benefits. It improves flexibility, reduces stress and can help lower blood pressure. Ruth Jenkinson/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

toggle caption
Ruth Jenkinson/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Tai chi reduces blood pressure better than aerobic exercise, study finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231232197/1231438499" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Purple Tomato, a genetically modified crop created by Norfolk Plant Sciences, is available to home gardeners to start from seed. Raven Villar/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Raven Villar/Boise State Public Radio

Gardeners can now grow a genetically modified purple tomato made with snapdragon DNA

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228868005/1229723135" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mark Guttridge, farmer and co-owner at Ollin Farms, feeds the chickens. The farm benefits from a county program that helps small growers get their produce to more people. Rachel Woolf for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Woolf for NPR

A big idea for small farms: How to link agriculture, nutrition and public health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228749130/1228839484" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Left: A Kool cigarettes advertisement targeting Black communities for a sponsored event, the Kool Jazz Festival; Right: A Kent cigarettes ad targeting Black smokers. Stanford Research into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising hide caption

toggle caption
Stanford Research into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising

The fight over banning menthol cigarettes has a long history steeped in race

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228008720/1228286390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iain Campbell, a researcher in Scotland, has lived with bipolar disorder since he was young. After trying the ketogenic diet, he discovered profound improvements in his symptoms — and now wants to learn if it can do the same for others. He shared his recent findings at the Metabolic Health Summit in Clearwater, Fla., on Jan. 25. Tina Russell for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tina Russell for NPR

Patients say keto helps with their mental illness. Science is racing to understand why

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1227062470/1228756281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maribel Martinez shops the produce section at King Sooper's in Boulder, Colo., the day after picking up her Fruit & Veg coupons. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

To get fresh vegetables to people who need them, one city puts its soda tax to work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1224627771/1224762832" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Canada's Vasek Pospisil is a co-founder of the Professional Tennis Players Association, a players advocacy group. He says problems with tennis balls used on tour are linked to wrist, elbow and shoulder injuries among players. Pascal Guyot/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pascal Guyot/AFP via Getty Images

For patients with long COVID, exercise can lead to a worsening of symptoms, a condition called post-exertional malaise. New research shows what's going on in their muscles. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

toggle caption
Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

A discovery in the muscles of long COVID patients may explain exercise troubles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223077307/1224126523" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brazil's government is looking to double down on the country's school feeding program, along with other efforts to alleviate post-pandemic poverty. Tuane Fernandes for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tuane Fernandes for NPR

One common stumbling block to sticking with a New Year's resolution is setting an unrealistic goal. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Westend61/Getty Images

Don't let your resolutions wash away. Tips to turn a slow start into progress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223173854/1223424864" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript