Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

For most of us, the benefits of a walk greatly outweigh the risks, doctors say. Get off the couch now. Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images

Walk Your Dog, But Watch Your Footing: Bone Breaks Are On The Rise

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BrittLee Bowman competes during a recent cyclecross race. She was diagnosed with breast cancer and faced a decision on how to treat it. Courtesy of Dan Chabanov hide caption

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Courtesy of Dan Chabanov

Cancer Leads Athlete To Tough Choice

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Logan Davis #1 congratulates Ohio State Buckeyes teammate Nick Oddo #15 for scoring a goal on March 22, 2014. Hannah Foslien/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Underdiagnosed Male Eating Disorders Are Becoming Increasingly Identified

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Several U.S. cities have enacted taxes on sweetened drinks to raise money and fight obesity. But the results are mixed on how well they curb consumption. Daniel Acker/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Soda Taxes Work, Studies Suggest — But Maybe Not As Well As Hoped

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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Soda bottles displayed in a San Francisco market.A federal appeals court blocked a city law requiring advertisement warnings on the potential health impacts of sugary drinks. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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To help protect the planet and promote good health, people should eat less than 1 ounce of red meat a day and limit poultry and milk, too. That's according to a new report from some of the top names in nutrition science. People should instead consume more nuts, fruits and vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, the report says. The strict recommended limits on meat are getting pushback. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

Skeletal muscle cells from a rabbit were stained with fluorescent markers to highlight cell nuclei (blue) and proteins in the cytoskeleton (red and green). Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source hide caption

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Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source

Shoppers say they want simpler information to help them figure out which foods are healthy. But a one-size-fits-all solution may not work. asiseeit/Getty Images hide caption

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Jenna Sterner/NPR

Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

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You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

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"It feels like confessing a crime," Tommy Tomlinson says about revealing his weight in his new book, The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man's Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America. Courtesy of Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

He Was 460 Pounds. What Confronting His Weight Taught Him About Obesity In America

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Even something as simple as chopping up food on a regular basis can be enough exercise to help protect older people from showing signs of dementia, a new study suggests. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

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A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

"Feeling better isn't just this selfish, hedonic thing — it actually is fuel. I consider energy from taking care of yourself as essential fuel for the things that matter most in our lives," says Michelle Segar, a psychologist at the University of Michigan who studies how we sustain healthy behaviors like exercise. Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise

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Left to right: The trainer demonstrates squats with a chair, pull-ups with a towel wrapped around a banister and jumping jack intervals. Jenna Sterner/NPR hide caption

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Jenna Sterner/NPR

Get Fit — Faster: This 22-Minute Workout Has You Covered

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Costco Wholesale requires its food suppliers to undergo annual inspections and requires some produce suppliers to hold shipments until tests come back negative for disease-causing bacteria. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Don't Panic: The Government Shutdown Isn't Making Food Unsafe

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