Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

Sarah Comer demonstrates the game Beat Saber using a virtual reality headset in Washington, D.C. During the pandemic, Comer and her family had a competition from their respective homes across several states to see who could rack up the most points on some of the exercise games on their VR headsets, "as a motivator for us to exercise and stay connected," she says. Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

4 ways to make your workout actually fun, according to behavioral scientists

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A third-grader punches in her student identification to pay for a meal at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe, N.M. During the pandemic, schools were able to offer free school meals to all children regardless of need. Now advocates want to make that policy permanent. Morgan Lee/AP hide caption

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Morgan Lee/AP

Life Kit: How to 'futureproof' your body and relieve pain

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Augustin Laborde, owner of Le Paon Qui Boit, at his shop in Paris on Aug. 26. Matthew Avignone for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Avignone for NPR

Paris gets a non-alcoholic wine shop. Will the French drink it?

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The U.S. food system makes junk food plentiful and cheap. Eating a diet based on whole foods like fresh fruit and vegetables can promote health - but can also strain a tight grocery budget. Food leaders are looking for ways to improve how Americans eat. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

Air Force service members run a timed 1.5 miles during their annual physical fitness test at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois in June. The U.S. Space Force intends to do away with once-a-year assessments in favor of wearable technology. Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio

Brit Oliphant connected with her fourth-grade student, Seth Snyder through skateboarding. Brit was shocked to find out Seth was so passionate about skating but didn't have a skateboard of his own. She started an organization, Boards 4 Buddies, to change that. Nic Hibdige hide caption

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Nic Hibdige

This hybrid bull, which lives on the A&K Ranch near Raymondville, Mo., will be part of the process to create beefalo that are 37.5% bison, the magic number for the best beefalo meat. Jonathan Ahl/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Jonathan Ahl/Harvest Public Media

The baby-formula shortage has led some to question why the U.S. doesn't provide more support for breastfeeding. Here, a woman breastfeeds her son outside New York City Hall during a 2014 rally to support breastfeeding in public. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The baby formula shortage is prompting calls to increase support for breastfeeding

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A cyclist pauses outside the site of the supermarket shooting in Buffalo, N.Y. With the Tops store closed for the foreseeable future, the community around it has been left without easy access to healthy and affordable food. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

A woman shops for baby formula in Annapolis, Md., on May 16. Only a handful of companies supply baby formula in the country, a factor that has contributed to the current shortages being experienced in parts of the country. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

How the U.S. got into this baby formula mess

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A combine harvests wheat, near Pullman, Wash. Preventing food insecurity globally amid skyrocketing prices driven by the war in Ukraine will be the main topic at the IMF and World Bank Spring Meetings. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

William Terry, of Terry Farms, looks at strawberries at his farm Thursday, March 31, 2022, in Oxnard, Calif. Terry Farms, which grows produce on 2,100 acres largely, has seen prices of some fertilizer formulations double; others are up 20%. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

Scheduling time on the calendar for a workout and setting small, achievable goals are just a couple of ways we can focus on rebuilding healthy habits. Michael Driver for NPR hide caption

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Michael Driver for NPR

Getting hurt is a risk of the physical activity we do to stay in shape, but research shows that the way you approach your injury can help you heal. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

A glass is filled in with water on April 27, 2014 in Paris. Scientists studying what makes us thirsty have found the body checks in on our water consumption in several different ways. FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images

Thirsty? Here's how your brain answers that question

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