Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

"Feeling better isn't just this selfish, hedonic thing — it actually is fuel. I consider energy from taking care of yourself as essential fuel for the things that matter most in our lives," says Michelle Segar, a psychologist at the University of Michigan who studies how we sustain healthy behaviors like exercise. Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise

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Left to right: The trainer demonstrates squats with a chair, pull-ups with a towel wrapped around a banister and jumping jack intervals. Jenna Sterner/NPR hide caption

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Jenna Sterner/NPR

Get Fit — Faster: This 22-Minute Workout Has You Covered

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Costco Wholesale requires its food suppliers to undergo annual inspections and requires some produce suppliers to hold shipments until tests come back negative for disease-causing bacteria. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Don't Panic: The Government Shutdown Isn't Making Food Unsafe

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Students exercise at a weight-loss summer camp in China's Shandong Province. The government promotes physical activity as the solution to a growing obesity problem. Wang Zhide/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhide/VCG via Getty Images

Winter swimmers enjoyed an icy dip in Poland's Garczyn lake last February. Recorded air temperature was around 14 degrees Farenheit, and a large ice hole had to be cut to allow the lake bathing. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/Getty Images

Though his politics are right of center and he lobbied hard against the Affordable Care Act, Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch also has been key to passing several landmark health laws with bipartisan support. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Getty Images

How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

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Coconut oil's potential health benefits are outweighed by its heavy dose of saturated fat, most nutrition experts say. Saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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The NPR staff likes to exercise in several different ways. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack/NPR

How To Make Exercise A Habit That Sticks

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A customer holds a McDonald's Big Mac. The fast-food giant, one of the world's biggest beef buyers, has announced plans to use its might to cut back on antibiotics in its global beef supply. Environmentalists are applauding the commitment. Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

The people who got caught up in the exercise boom of the 1970s and stuck with it into their senior years now have significantly healthier hearts and muscles than their sedentary counterparts. David Trood/Getty Images hide caption

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David Trood/Getty Images

Exercise Wins: Fit Seniors Can Have Hearts That Look 30 Years Younger

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A business decision by UnitedHealthcare, the nation's largest health insurance carrier, to drop a popular fitness benefit has upset many people covered by the company's Medicare plans. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Unless you're an extreme athlete, recovering from an injury, or over 60, you probably need only 50 to 60 grams of protein a day. And you probably already get that in your food without adding pills, bars or powders. Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook and Heather Kim/NPR

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

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London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced a ban on junk food advertisements across the city's transportation network on Friday. The new rules will take effect on Feb. 25, 2019. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Getting physical activity every day can help maintain health throughout your life. Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images

New Physical Activity Guidelines Urge Americans: Move More, Sit Less

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Taking fish oil supplements to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer may not be effective, a new study suggests. Cathy Scola/Getty Images hide caption

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Cathy Scola/Getty Images

Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Mostly Disappoint In Long-Awaited Research Results

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The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

Shoppers who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program may find it harder to use their benefits to purchase fresh fruit and vegetables at farmers markets like this one in Minneapolis, Minn., while the goverment changes contractors. Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images