Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

A Planet Fitness employee cleans equipment before a gym's reopening in March in Inglewood, Calif., after being closed due to COVID-19. Reduced access to recreation likely has contributed to weight gain during the pandemic. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Weightlifting or other forms of strength training can be a smart addition to your exercise routines. It can help stave off chronic illness and manage weight gain. gradyreese/Getty Images hide caption

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Maillard Howell, head of fitness at Reebok and co-owner of Dean CrossFit, doesn't promise clients they'll be the most ripped person on the beach. Instead, he tells them, "you're going to be able to play with your kids without getting out of breath." Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

One neuroscientist finds that simply savoring a cup of tea as a daily morning ritual has helped her quell anxious thoughts in pandemic times. "It felt like I finally had a great excuse to just be present and enjoy the breeze and warmth of the bowl of tea and the reflections that I could see on the surface," she says. Catherine Falls Commercial/Getty Images hide caption

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Catherine Falls Commercial/Getty Images
Janice Chang for NPR

Don't Focus On Kids' Weight Gain. Focus On Healthy Habits Instead

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Annie Kunz in the women's heptathlon 100-meter hurdles during the Olympic trials in Eugene, Ore., in June. Building her training regimen around recent findings from sex-specific sports medicine research has made a difference in her performance, says Kunz, who is competing at the Tokyo Olympics. Steph Chambers/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Sweat Is A Human Superpower

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Los Angeles Unified School District food service workers pre-package hundreds of free school lunches in July at the Liechty Middle School in Los Angeles. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

When working out in the summer, watch for the signs of dehydration and heat stroke. Choosing a later evening or early morning time for a run in one smart way to stay safe. RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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Health conditions exacerbated by obesity include heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, according to the CDC. Researchers say the newly approved drug Wegovy could help many who struggle with obesity lose weight. adamkaz/Getty Images hide caption

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Obesity Drug's Promise Now Hinges On Insurance Coverage

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By the time Victoria Cooper enrolled in an alcohol treatment program in 2018, she was "drinking for survival," not pleasure, she says — multiple vodka shots in the morning, at lunchtime and beyond. In the treatment program, she saw other women in their 20s struggling with alcohol and other drugs. "It was the first time in a very long time that I had not felt alone," she says. Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope

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A group of runners compete in the New York City Marathon in 2019. It's one of many big city races to return this year after they were cancelled over pandemic health restrictions in 2020. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Big City Marathons Are Coming Back

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Ietef "DJ Cavem Moetavation" Vita plants seeds with daughter Libya LeaDonvita in the garden at their home outside Denver. Vita is among a growing list of Black gardening enthusiasts-turned-entrepreneurs across the country who've launched seed businesses during the pandemic-inspired gardening boom. Rachel Woolf for KHN hide caption

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Rachel Woolf for KHN
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Staff Sgt. Stephen Ahlstrom (left) is an Army recruiter who has been mentoring potential recruits in weight loss to meet his enlistment goals. The work he does with young people such as Robinson (right) is not part of an official military program. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Fighting Weight: How Military Recruiters Take On Obesity, Case By Case

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Hooked author Michael Moss says processed food companies appeal to our childhood nostalgia: "What we eat is all about memory." Grace Cary/Getty Images hide caption

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Cheap, Legal And Everywhere: How Food Companies Get Us 'Hooked' On Junk

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