Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Seeing double after toasting? Just wait for the hangover that's coming, thanks in part to those bubbles in sparkling wine. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Want To Avoid A Hangover? Science Has Got You Covered

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Clockwise from top left: General Mills, Nestle, Dunkin Donuts, Panera, Tyson Chicken and McDonald's, among other big food companies, made commitments in 2015 to change the way they prepare and procure their food products. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty

The Year In Food: Artificial Out, Innovation In (And 2 More Trends)

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Why Food Poisoning Outbreaks Appear To Be On The Rise

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Tulane's medical school is one of the first to teach medical students how to cook healthful food, with the goal that they'll share that knowledge with patients. Jeff Kubina/Flickr hide caption

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Jeff Kubina/Flickr

Lucky Iron Fish for sale in Phnom Penh. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

In Cambodia, 'Lucky' Iron Fish For The Cooking Pot Could Fight Anemia

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Ray Spaulding cooks apples in front of a class on cooking healthful desserts at the Portland VA withJessica Mooney, right, a clinical dietitian. About 80 percent of veterans are overweight and obese and another quarter have diabetes, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Conrad Wilson/OPB hide caption

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Conrad Wilson/OPB

In Portland, A Boot Camp To Help Veterans Cook Healthier Food

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A team of pediatricians noticed that many of their young black and Hispanic patients were deficient in vitamin D. A hefty weekly dose of of the vitamin for two months was needed to get most of the teens' blood levels to the concentration that endocrinologists advise. Noel Hendrickson/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Noel Hendrickson/Ocean/Corbis

A woman washes dishes on the street in Hanoi, Vietnam. The World Health Organization says the burden of foodborne disease in Southeast Asia is one of the highest in the world. Luong Thai Linh/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Luong Thai Linh/EPA/Landov

The food industry has processed lots of foods to hit that "bliss point" — that perfect amount of sweetness that would send eaters over the moon. In doing so, it's added sweetness in plenty of unexpected places – like bread and pasta sauce, says investigative reporter Michael Moss. Yagi Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Yagi Studio/Getty Images

An Israeli soldier eats a piece of watermelon near Israel's border with the Gaza Strip in 2014. As more Israelis go vegan, the country's military has made dietary and clothing accommodations for soldiers. Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images