Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

Several U.S. cities have enacted taxes on sweetened drinks to raise money and fight obesity. But the results are mixed on how well they curb consumption. Daniel Acker/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Getty Images

U.S. Soda Taxes Work, Studies Suggest — But Maybe Not As Well As Hoped

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France Recognizes Lightsaber Dueling, 'Time' Magazine Reports

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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Soda bottles displayed in a San Francisco market.A federal appeals court blocked a city law requiring advertisement warnings on the potential health impacts of sugary drinks. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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To help protect the planet and promote good health, people should eat less than 1 ounce of red meat a day and limit poultry and milk, too. That's according to a new report from some of the top names in nutrition science. People should instead consume more nuts, fruits and vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, the report says. The strict recommended limits on meat are getting pushback. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

Skeletal muscle cells from a rabbit were stained with fluorescent markers to highlight cell nuclei (blue) and proteins in the cytoskeleton (red and green). Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source hide caption

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Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source

Shoppers say they want simpler information to help them figure out which foods are healthy. But a one-size-fits-all solution may not work. asiseeit/Getty Images hide caption

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asiseeit/Getty Images

Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

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You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

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"It feels like confessing a crime," Tommy Tomlinson says about revealing his weight in his new book, The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man's Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America. Courtesy of Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

He Was 460 Pounds. What Confronting His Weight Taught Him About Obesity In America

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