Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Shoppers sort through yellow plums at the Union Square Park greenmarket in New York City. A study of retailers in Manhattan finds that organic foods are much more common in affluent neighborhoods. Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

People who drink in moderation tend to be better educated and more well off, which increases their odds of being healthy. Photographer: Katsiaryna Pakhoma/iStockphoto hide caption

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Photographer: Katsiaryna Pakhoma/iStockphoto

Students eat breakfast at the Blueberry Harvest School at Harrington Elementary School in Harrington, Maine. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

An analysis of 20 studies failed to find good evidence that standing at a work desk is better than sitting. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR
Katherine Du/NPR

Chew On This: Slicing Meat Helped Shape Modern Humans

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Nearly one-third of households on SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, still have to visit a food pantry to keep themselves fed, according to USDA data. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Katherine Du/NPR

Sleep Munchies: Why It's Harder To Resist Snacks When We're Tired

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We know eating more produce is good for your heart. Now computer models suggest slashing the price by about a third could result in dramatically lower death rates from heart disease and stroke. iStockphoto hide caption

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Ashara Manns says she has to plan her meals around how much bottled water she has. Rebecca Kruth for NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Kruth for NPR

Doctors In Flint, Mich., Push A Healthy Diet To Fight Lead Exposure

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