Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

The Salt Institute spent decades questioning government efforts to limit Americans' sodium intake. Critics say the institute muddied the links between salt and health. Now it has shut its doors. ATU Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ATU Images/Getty Images

After A Century, A Voice For The U.S. Salt Industry Goes Quiet

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Oily fish such as salmon, sardines and lake trout, as well as some plant sources such as walnuts and flaxseed, can be good, tasty sources of omega-3 fatty acids. MinoruM/Getty Images hide caption

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Eating Fish May Help City Kids With Asthma Breathe Better

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association, in a joint statement, endorsed taxes on sugary drinks, restrictions on marketing to kids and incentives for healthier purchases. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

For people with a rare condition known as misophonia, certain sounds like slurping, chewing, tapping and clicking can elicit intense feelings of rage or panic. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Misophonia: When Life's Noises Drive You Mad

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A study found that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

For most of us, the benefits of a walk greatly outweigh the risks, doctors say. Get off the couch now. Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images

Walk Your Dog, But Watch Your Footing: Bone Breaks Are On The Rise

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BrittLee Bowman competes during a recent cyclecross race. She was diagnosed with breast cancer and faced a decision on how to treat it. Courtesy of Dan Chabanov hide caption

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Courtesy of Dan Chabanov

Cancer Leads Athlete To Tough Choice

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Logan Davis #1 congratulates Ohio State Buckeyes teammate Nick Oddo #15 for scoring a goal on March 22, 2014. Hannah Foslien/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Underdiagnosed Male Eating Disorders Are Becoming Increasingly Identified

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Several U.S. cities have enacted taxes on sweetened drinks to raise money and fight obesity. But the results are mixed on how well they curb consumption. Daniel Acker/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Soda Taxes Work, Studies Suggest — But Maybe Not As Well As Hoped

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France Recognizes Lightsaber Dueling, 'Time' Magazine Reports

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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