Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Matailong Du/NPR

A child runs a shopping cart relay during an Education Department summer enrichment event, "Let's Read, Let's Move." The 2012 event was part of a summer initiative to engage youths in summer reading and physical activity, and provide them information about healthy, affordable food. Many efforts underway are aimed at getting people to think anew about their daily habits. Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images

McDonald's is super popular in Israel — the chain even offers potato-starch hamburger buns, like this one, that are kosher for Passover. But now McD's is fighting back against the Israeli health ministry's accusations that it's "junk food." Daniel Estrin for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin for NPR

It's not just kombucha and yogurt: Probiotics are now showing up in dozens of packaged foods. But what exactly do these designer foods with friendly flora actually offer — besides a high price tag? Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The FDA says tortillas and other foods made with corn masa flour can now be fortified with folic acid. The move is aimed at reducing severe brain and spinal cord defects in babies born to Hispanic women. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Verónica Zaragovia for NPR
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A Fitbit Saved His Life? Well, Maybe

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Khadija Sabir of Lovie Lee's Stars of Tomorrow preschool in Philadelphia attends a soda tax rally with three of her charges. The proposed tax promises to pay for universal pre-K, parks and recreation centers. Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Philly Wants To Tax Soda To Raise Money For Schools

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A view of the lush Samoan vegetation in American Samoa, Tutuila Island. LCDR Eric Johnson/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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LCDR Eric Johnson/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Shoppers sort through yellow plums at the Union Square Park greenmarket in New York City. A study of retailers in Manhattan finds that organic foods are much more common in affluent neighborhoods. Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

People who drink in moderation tend to be better educated and more well off, which increases their odds of being healthy. Photographer: Katsiaryna Pakhoma/iStockphoto hide caption

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Photographer: Katsiaryna Pakhoma/iStockphoto