Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

A typical label includes safe cooking instructions. This label on blade-tenderized beef sold at Costco recommends 160 degrees as the minimum internal temperature, which doesn't require a three-minute rest time. Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR hide caption

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Lydia Zuraw/KHN for NPR

Coming soon: The redesigned nutrition facts label will highlight added sugars in food. The label also will display calories per serving, and serving size, more prominently. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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U.S. Food and Drug Administration

A 1950s poster from the National Dairy Council. Ads like these helped fuel the rise of cereal as a breakfast staple. David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Images

Breakfast Backtrack: Maybe Skipping The Morning Meal Isn't So Bad

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These mitochondria, in red, are from the heart muscle cell of a rat. Mitochondria have been described as "the powerhouses of the cell" because they generate most of a cell's supply of chemical energy. But at least one type of complex cell doesn't need 'em, it turns out. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The maker of Kind bars — which contain almonds and other nuts — pushed back against an FDA complaint about its use of the phrase "healthy and tasty." The FDA is now reviewing its definition of "healthy" as used on food labels. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why The FDA Is Re-Evaluating The Nutty Definition Of 'Healthy' Food

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Jaime Rangel helps Gustavo Ruiz, 12, align a tire on his bike, at a recent community event in southeast Fresno, Calif. As manager for Bici Projects, Rangel promotes cycling in the Latino community as a great way to get in shape. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

Danny Cahill (left) won Season 8 of The Biggest Loser in 2009 by losing an amazing 239 pounds. He's pictured with at-home prize winner Rebecca Meyer. In the years since, Cahill has put back on more than 100 pounds, he told The New York Times. NBC via Getty Images hide caption

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NBC via Getty Images

'Biggest Loser' Lessons: Why The Body Makes It Hard To Keep Pounds Off

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain

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The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Matailong Du/NPR