Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

New research shows that daily light walking is important for maintaining health as you age. But if you can't hit 10,000 steps, don't worry. Peter Muller/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Peter Muller/Getty Images/Cultura RF

10,000 Steps A Day? How Many You Really Need To Boost Longevity

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New research confirms what we've been hearing for years: Cooking from scratch and eating "real food" is healthier than consuming the highly processed foods that make up the majority of calories in the American diet. The problem is that knowing this doesn't make it any more doable for the average family. Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

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Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd./Getty Images

Confusion over whether food is still safe to eat after its "sell by" or "use before" date accounts for about one-fifth of food waste in U.S. homes, the FDA says. The agency is urging the food industry to adopt "best if used by" wording on packaged foods. zoranm/Getty Images hide caption

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zoranm/Getty Images

To Reduce Food Waste, FDA Urges 'Best If Used By' Date Labels

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A new study finds that women who ate a low-fat diet and more fruits, vegetables and grains, lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer. But which of those factors provided the protective effect? Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF

An example of one of the study's ultra-processed lunches consists of quesadillas, refried beans and diet lemonade. Participants on this diet ate an average of 508 calories more per day and gained an average of 2 pounds over two weeks. Hall et al./Cell Metabolism hide caption

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Hall et al./Cell Metabolism

It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain

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A large new study finds mixed results for the effectiveness of programs aimed at motivating healthful behavior — such as more exercise and better nutrition — among employees. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Jessica Holloway-Haytcher uses an app that helps her track meals, exercise and keep in touch with an online coach. Mark Rogers Photography hide caption

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Mark Rogers Photography

My New Diet Is An App: Weight Loss Goes Digital

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The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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stock_colors/Getty Images

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

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Flo Filion Meiler, 84, during pole vault training last month. She mostly works out alone, but has a coach to help refine her technique in events like shot put and high jump. Lisa Rathke/AP hide caption

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Lisa Rathke/AP

Such Great Heights: 84-Year-Old Pole Vaulter Keeps Raising The Bar

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A lawsuit filed by attorneys general from six states and the District of Columbia says the weakened federal nutrition standards for school meals are putting kids at greater risk of health problems linked to diet. JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Poor diet is the leading risk factor for deaths from lifestyle-related diseases in the majority of the world, according to new research. John D. Buffington/Getty Images hide caption

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John D. Buffington/Getty Images

Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds

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The Salt Institute spent decades questioning government efforts to limit Americans' sodium intake. Critics say the institute muddied the links between salt and health. Now it has shut its doors. ATU Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ATU Images/Getty Images

After A Century, A Voice For The U.S. Salt Industry Goes Quiet

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Oily fish such as salmon, sardines and lake trout, as well as some plant sources such as walnuts and flaxseed, can be good, tasty sources of omega-3 fatty acids. MinoruM/Getty Images hide caption

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MinoruM/Getty Images

Eating Fish May Help City Kids With Asthma Breathe Better

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association, in a joint statement, endorsed taxes on sugary drinks, restrictions on marketing to kids and incentives for healthier purchases. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images