Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Bite into that bread before your main meal, and you'll spike your blood sugar and amp up your appetite. Waiting until the end of your dinner to nosh on bread can blunt those effects. iStockphoto hide caption

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Curb Your Appetite: Save Bread For The End Of The Meal

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Bill McKelvey created Grow Well Missouri with a five-year grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to help create more access to produce — and the health benefits that come with growing it yourself. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

On the left, olive oil, which is low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat, which may lower bad cholesterol levels. On the right, coconut oil, which is 90 percent saturated fat and may raise bad cholesterol levels. iStockphoto hide caption

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Eating eggs with your salad helps boost absorption of carotenoids — the pigments in tomatoes and carrots. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Take A Hike To Do Your Heart And Spirit Good

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In the current version of the Fitnet App, the camera of an exerciser's smartphone captures data from him (upper left), while a prerecorded trainer guides him through a workout. A clock (bottom center) shows elapsed time. The orange dots (upper left) indicate he's following her routine well, as judged by the camera and phone's app. The app can also estimate the exerciser's number of steps. Courtesy of FitNet hide caption

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Courtesy of FitNet

Soda delivery in Bosque de Chapultepec, Mexico City. Between 1989 and 2006, the consumption of sugary drinks increased by 60 percent per capita in Mexico. Omar Bárcena/Flickr hide caption

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Omar Bárcena/Flickr

Horses, riders and runners crossed three streams in the course of their 22-mile race through the hills of central Wales. The average finish time was the same for both species — four hours. Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear hide caption

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Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear

The Neighs Have It: Horse Outruns Man, But Just Barely

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There's a growing body of evidence suggesting that compounds found in cocoa beans, called polyphenols, may help protect against heart disease. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

Chocolate, Chocolate, It's Good For Your Heart, Study Finds

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Microwave popcorn containing trans fats from November 2013. The Grocery Manufacturers Association says the industry has lowered the amount of trans fat added to food products by more than 86 percent. But trans fats can still be found in some processed food items. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters/Landov

FDA To Food Companies: This Time, Zero Means Zero Trans Fats

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Chris Tremblay, a member of the Passive Acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, deploys an underwater recording device along the Eastern Seaboard to listen for the mating sounds of Atlantic cod. Courtesy of Chris Tremblay hide caption

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Courtesy of Chris Tremblay

Scientists, Fishing Fleet Team Up To Save Cod — By Listening

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Poll: A Look At Sports And Health In America

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Even golfers using a motorized cart can burn about 1,300 calories and walk 2 miles when playing 18 holes. Halfdark/fstop/Corbis hide caption

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Halfdark/fstop/Corbis

Take A Swing At This: Golf Is Exercise, Cart Or No Cart

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