Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

Puerto Rican residents received food and water from FEMA after Hurricane Maria, but many complained that some boxes were stuffed with candy and salty snacks, not meals. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A study finds light drinkers have the lowest combined risk of getting cancer and dying prematurely — lower than nondrinkers. Alcohol is estimated to be the third-largest contributor to overall cancer deaths. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Drinking Alcohol Can Raise Cancer Risk. How Much Is Too Much?

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Rice within the octagon in this field is part of an experiment to grow rice under different levels of carbon dioxide. Toshihiro Hasegawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan hide caption

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Toshihiro Hasegawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan

As Carbon Dioxide Levels Rise, Major Crops Are Losing Nutrients

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A serving of salmon contains about 600 IUs of vitamin D, researchers say, and a cup of fortified milk around 100. Cereals and juices are sometimes fortified, too. Check the labels, researchers say, and aim for 600 IUs daily, or 800 if you're older than 70. Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley hide caption

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Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?

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In midcentury home economic classes, girls learned to cook for their future husbands while boys took shop. But now kids might learn about healthy relationships or how to balance a bank account. Mark Jay Goebel/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Jay Goebel/Getty Images

Flaws in a study of the Mediterranean diet led to a softening of its conclusions about health benefits. But don't switch to a diet of cotton candy just yet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Rinsing your produce is a good idea, but it won't give you 100 percent protection from bacteria that cause foodborne illness unless you cook it thoroughly. Because we eat lettuce raw, a lot of people got sick in a recent outbreak. StockFood/Getty Images/Foodcollection hide caption

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StockFood/Getty Images/Foodcollection

A growing number of Muslim food bloggers and dietitians are trying to address the shifting needs of busy Muslims who want to eat healthy, nutritious meals when breaking fast. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images
Fabio Consoli for NPR

Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

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Doug Brown and his brother Roger, right, operate Slopeside Syrup in Richmond, Vt. They're challenging a proposed federal label that would say maple syrup has "added sugar." John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio

Growing up, Liam Foley (left) was in charge of dishes and never cooked. He was still able to help chop the onions, though, at a burrito-making project for the poor in San Francisco. Alan Greenblatt/NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt/NPR

Scientists find that rice grown under elevated carbon conditions loses substantial amounts of protein, zinc, iron and B vitamins, depending on the variety. Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage hide caption

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Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage

A man shops for vegetables beside romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Hey, Salad Lovers: It's OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again

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Frozen vegetables are displayed for sale at an Aldi supermarket in Hackensack, N.J. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Frozen Food Fan? As Sales Rise, Studies Show Frozen Produce Is As Healthy As Fresh

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