Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

Even with visits to the local food pantry, many families struggle to get enough to eat. Food banks say rethinking our donations could help them stretch their money. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Researchers studied the gut microbes of runners from the Boston Marathon, isolating one strain of bacteria that may boost athletic performance. Nicolaus Czarnecki/Boston Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolaus Czarnecki/Boston Herald via Getty Images

A bowl of tsampa flour pictured with other dishes in a typical Tibetan lunch. Counterclockwise from left: potatoes in turmeric and cumin; liangfen; mung bean jelly and spring onions with cilantro, triple-fried in red chili pepper; and black tea. To make pa, the tsampa would be mixed with butter, tea, salt and sometimes Tibetan cheese. Courtesy of Tsering Shakya hide caption

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Courtesy of Tsering Shakya

Chris Marshall has organized pop-up Sans Bars in New York, Washington, D.C., and Anchorage, Alaska. And he has expanded into permanent spaces in Kansas City, Mo., and western Massachusetts. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson for NPR

Breaking The Booze Habit, Even Briefly, Has Its Benefits

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Processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, cook in a frying pan. A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who cut back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images
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Why Food Reformers Have Mixed Feelings About Eco-Labels

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A sign in the window of a New York City market advertises the acceptance of food stamps. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How A Fight Over Beef Jerky Reveals Tensions Over SNAP In The Trump Era

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New research shows that daily light walking is important for maintaining health as you age. But if you can't hit 10,000 steps, don't worry. Peter Muller/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Peter Muller/Getty Images/Cultura RF

10,000 Steps A Day? How Many You Really Need To Boost Longevity

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New research confirms what we've been hearing for years: Cooking from scratch and eating "real food" is healthier than consuming the highly processed foods that make up the majority of calories in the American diet. The problem is that knowing this doesn't make it any more doable for the average family. Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

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Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd./Getty Images

Confusion over whether food is still safe to eat after its "sell by" or "use before" date accounts for about one-fifth of food waste in U.S. homes, the FDA says. The agency is urging the food industry to adopt "best if used by" wording on packaged foods. zoranm/Getty Images hide caption

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zoranm/Getty Images

To Reduce Food Waste, FDA Urges 'Best If Used By' Date Labels

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A new study finds that women who ate a low-fat diet and more fruits, vegetables and grains, lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer. But which of those factors provided the protective effect? Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF

An example of one of the study's ultra-processed lunches consists of quesadillas, refried beans and diet lemonade. Participants on this diet ate an average of 508 calories more per day and gained an average of 2 pounds over two weeks. Hall et al./Cell Metabolism hide caption

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Hall et al./Cell Metabolism

It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain

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A large new study finds mixed results for the effectiveness of programs aimed at motivating healthful behavior — such as more exercise and better nutrition — among employees. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Jessica Holloway-Haytcher uses an app that helps her track meals, exercise and keep in touch with an online coach. Mark Rogers Photography hide caption

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Mark Rogers Photography

My New Diet Is An App: Weight Loss Goes Digital

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The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

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