Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

Fitness & Nutrition

In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration sent an advisory about an outbreak of listeria linked to cantaloupes killed 33 people. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP

FDA Not Doing Enough To Fix Serious Food Safety Violations, Report Finds

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Panera's CEO has challenged other fast-food CEOs to eat their kids' menus for a week. He's trying to start a conversation about the nutrition in these meals. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

More Healthful Kids Meals? Panera CEO Dishes Out A Challenge

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Food allergies are tricky to diagnose, and many kids can outgrow them, too. A test called an oral food challenge is the gold standard to rule out an allergy. It's performed under medical supervision. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

This Test Can Determine Whether You've Outgrown A Food Allergy

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Dorothy Boddie runs the outreach ministry at Allen Chapel AME, one of the Capital Area Food Bank's nonprofit partners. The D.C.-area food bank is part of a growing trend to move toward healthier options in food assistance, because many in the population it serves suffer from high blood pressure and diabetes. Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank hide caption

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Courtesy of Capital Area Food Bank

Michael Jacobson (right) and Bonnie Liebman, CSPI's director of nutrition, launching a campaign against over-salted food in the late 1970s. Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest

A Pioneer Of Food Activism Steps Down, Looks Back

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Get Off The Couch Baby Boomers, Or You May Not Be Able To Later

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Ben Hansen (left) watches data on a hand-held device as Pittsburgh Pirates prospect Matt Benedict throws a ball. Benedict is wearing sensors that recorded 39 sets of measurements. Tamara Lush/AP hide caption

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Tamara Lush/AP

What's Up Those Baseball Sleeves? Lots Of Data, And Privacy Concerns

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Vanessa Wauchope begins abdominal exercises in Leah Keller's class in San Francisco, Calif. Keller teaches an exercise, called "drawing in," to help strengthen abdominal muscles that tend to spread apart a bit during pregnancy. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here's a reality check: Many social drinkers may "binge" without knowing it. Women who drink four or more drinks on an occasion are binge-drinking. Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works hide caption

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Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works

With Heavy Drinking On The Rise, How Much Is Too Much?

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