Fitness & Nutrition Fitness & Nutrition

A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — including pulling the plug on a study it funded. Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Tell Us

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U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, shown here testifying before a Senate committee in 2017, says President Trump's top health priority is addressing opioid addiction. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Says Working Together Is Key To Combating Opioid Crisis

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In his new book, Dr. Aaron Carroll explains that there might be less evidence against some notoriously bad foods than we think. MHJ/Getty Images hide caption

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MHJ/Getty Images

'The Bad Food Bible' Says Your Eating Might Not Be So Sinful After All

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Sam Kass speaks at TED Talks Live - Education Revolution. Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED

Sam Kass: Can Free Breakfast Improve Learning?

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With Stricter Guidelines, Do You Have High Blood Pressure Now?

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A menu board shows calorie counts hangs at a Starbucks in New York City. The FDA had previously halted the roll out of rules requiring chain restaurants and other food establishments to post calories on menus. Now, the agency says the rules will be in place by May 2018. Candice Choi/AP hide caption

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Candice Choi/AP

Scientists have used a new gene-editing technique to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat. Infrared pictures of 6-month-old pigs taken at zero, two, and four hours after cold exposure show that the pigs' thermoregulation was improved after insertion of the new gene. The modified pigs are on the right side of the images. Zheng et al. / PNAS hide caption

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Zheng et al. / PNAS

CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs

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The foods on the left contain naturally occurring fibers that are intrinsic in plants. The foods on the right contain isolated fibers, such as chicory root, which are extracted and added to processed foods. The FDA will determine whether added fibers can count as dietary fiber on nutrition facts labels. Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Carolyn Rogers/NPR

The FDA Will Decide Whether 26 Ingredients Count As Fiber

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Val Olson (from left), Rick Kamm, Steve David and Dee Haskins play up to the net during a pickleball game at Monument Valley Park in Colorado Springs, Colo., in 2011. Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images

Age-Defying Athletes May Provide Clues For The Rest Of Us

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Roughly 80 percent of all first strokes arise from risks that people can influence with behavioral changes, doctors say — risks like high blood pressure, smoking and drug abuse. Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images