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Lynda Trang Dai sits inside her restaurant, Lynda Sandwich, in Orange County, Calif. Lisa Morehouse/For NPR hide caption

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Lisa Morehouse/For NPR

At This Sandwich Shop, A Vietnamese Pop Star Serves Up Banh Mi

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You probably wouldn't want to eat these Jack O'Lanterns since they've been carved and sitting out. But this variety of pumpkin is perfectly edible and nutritious. Wildcat Dunny/Flickr hide caption

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Wildcat Dunny/Flickr

Chefs Kerry Heffernan and Tom Colicchio pose for a photo at Bearnaise, a Capitol Hill restaurant, on Tuesday before setting out for a day of lobbying lawmakers. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Kris Connor/Getty Images

Famous horror film actor Vincent Price also co-wrote a best-selling cookbook in the 1960s with his then-wife, Mary. The original cover of the book, A Treasury Of Great Recipes, is seen at left. It's just been reissued. William Claxton/A Treasury of Great Recipes; Price Family Trust hide caption

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William Claxton/A Treasury of Great Recipes; Price Family Trust

So Good You'll Scream? A Cookbook From Horror Icon Vincent Price

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Evelyn Birkby interviews guests on her KMA radio program, Down a Country Lane, in 1951 in Shenandoah, Iowa. Courtesy of University of Iowa Women's Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection hide caption

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Courtesy of University of Iowa Women's Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection

Zach Whitener, research associate at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, holds a cod while collecting samples for a study. Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Why Is It So Hard To Save Gulf Of Maine Cod? They're In Hot Water

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When salmon was out of season, diners in restaurants were likely to get a species other than what they ordered 67 percent of the time, a new survey finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Soda sales have been flattening, but the industry has stepped up marketing and lobbying, according to Marion Nestle in Soda Politics: Taking on Big Soda (And Winning). Akash Ghai/NPR hide caption

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Akash Ghai/NPR

Chipotle vs. McDonald's: The Rise Of Fast Casual Food In 'The New Yorker'

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For centuries, tea drinking has been synonymous with female tittle-tattle — even though men drank just as much tea. Old dictionaries of English slang provide colorful proof of this association. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Yelp users, who flock to the platform known for its reviews and recommendations, should be on the lookout for astroturfing — the creation of fake reviews to make a business look more popular. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Don't Necessarily Judge Your Next E-Book By Its Online Review

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How many hot dogs are safe to eat? We tackle your questions about an expert panel's conclusion that processed meats are carcinogenic. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Processed And Red Meat Could Cause Cancer? Your Questions Answered

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