Food Stories on food, nutrition, recipes, cooking, cookbook reviews, and health. Download Food and Hidden Kitchen podcasts and subscribe to RSS feeds.

Record Water Levels Shut Down Miles Of Mississippi River

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461627703/461627704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From 'Tostitos Lime' To 'Sexy Sunblock,' The Best Drinks Of 2015

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461627689/461627690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Seeing double after toasting? Just wait for the hangover that's coming, thanks in part to those bubbles in sparkling wine. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Nickels for NPR

Want To Avoid A Hangover? Science Has Got You Covered

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461594898/461594917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Cage-free chickens in a barn near Hershey, Pa., get to roam and perch on steel rods (but they don't go outside). In September, McDonald's said it would buy only cage-free eggs, inspiring several other food companies to follow suit. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR

Clockwise from top left: General Mills, Nestle, Dunkin Donuts, Panera, Tyson Chicken and McDonald's, among other big food companies, made commitments in 2015 to change the way they prepare and procure their food products. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty

The Year In Food: Artificial Out, Innovation In (And 2 More Trends)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460589462/461352978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ayesha Mumtaz inspects food during a raid on a backyard sweets factory in Lahore, Pakistan. Her campaign to clean up the kitchens and food factories of Pakistan has earned her the nickname "The Fearless One." Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Philip Reeves/NPR

Lahore's Food Safety Czar Declares 'War' On Unhygienic Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/459835645/461304354" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

José Anzaldo, the son of migrant farmworkers, has been to seven schools in three years. He's the subject of a documentary premiering Dec. 28 on PBS. Kate Schermerhorn/Courtesy of ITVS hide caption

toggle caption
Kate Schermerhorn/Courtesy of ITVS

Burnt Out On Leftovers Ideas? We've Got Some

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461173085/461173086" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tulane's medical school is one of the first to teach medical students how to cook healthful food, with the goal that they'll share that knowledge with patients. Jeff Kubina/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Kubina/Flickr

A man scans a voucher code in with his smartphone. Some food companies use labels like this to provide details about ingredients and manufacturing processes to consumers. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Can Big Food Win Friends By Revealing Its Secrets?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460304899/461046651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At the end of Charles Dickens' 1843 classic, A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge and his long-abused employee, Bob Cratchit, enjoy a mug of Smoking Bishop. It's a drink loaded with English history, politics and class identity. Illustration by John Leech, 1817-1864. Culture Club/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Culture Club/Getty Images