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Afternoon Tea, 1886. Chromolithograph after Kate Greenaway. If you're looking for finger sandwiches, dainty desserts and formality, afternoon tea is your cup. Print Collector/Getty Images hide caption

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Print Collector/Getty Images

A cabbage butterfly caterpillar. For tens of millions of years, these critters have been in an evolutionary arms race with plants they munch on. The end result: "mustard oil bombs" that also explode with flavor when we humans harness them to make condiments. Courtesy of Roger Meissen/Bond LSC hide caption

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Courtesy of Roger Meissen/Bond LSC

Bite into that bread before your main meal, and you'll spike your blood sugar and amp up your appetite. Waiting until the end of your dinner to nosh on bread can blunt those effects. iStockphoto hide caption

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Curb Your Appetite: Save Bread For The End Of The Meal

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To make baby back ribs in an hour, instead of the usual three to four hours, you'll need a pressure cooker. Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR

Do Try This At Home: Hacking Ribs — In The Pressure Cooker

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Drink Beck's? Anheuser-Busch May Owe You A Refund

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Bill McKelvey created Grow Well Missouri with a five-year grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to help create more access to produce — and the health benefits that come with growing it yourself. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

On the left, olive oil, which is low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat, which may lower bad cholesterol levels. On the right, coconut oil, which is 90 percent saturated fat and may raise bad cholesterol levels. iStockphoto hide caption

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Art of the people: Fill a glass with hope, a butter sculpture crafted by Jim Victor and Marie Pelton. "People don't understand how [the sculpting] is done --€” it's like magic and just appears," Victor says. "But people understand butter." Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton hide caption

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Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton

Eating eggs with your salad helps boost absorption of carotenoids — the pigments in tomatoes and carrots. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

AquaBounty's salmon (background) has been genetically modified to grow bigger and faster than a conventional Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground.) Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc.

The Smuttynose Towle Farm brewery in Hampton, N.H., has an invisible but tight envelope that keeps the interior temperature consistently cool or warm, prevents energy loss and ultimately saves money. Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company

This 55-foot-tall statue of the Jolly Green Giant — the instantly recognizable icon for General Mills' Green Giant line of frozen vegetables — is in Blue Earth, Minn., about 100 miles away from the company's headquarters in Minneapolis. Robin Zebrowski/Flickr hide caption

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Robin Zebrowski/Flickr

As Tastes Shift, Food Giant General Mills Gets A Makeover

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