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Samuel Swedi, 22, is an electrical engineering student at Goma University in the Democratic Republic of Congo. He doesn't have a textbook — just whatever notes he has written in his notebook. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

In this picture taken on September 3, 2019 used medical waste is pictured on Clifton beach in Karachi. - Swarms of flies, water-borne illnesses, and rivers of sewage have brought Pakistan's Karachi to its knees this rainy season as decades of mismanagement have turned the countrys commercial capital into a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Twin brothers Ivan (left) and Jose López expect to make about $6 a month each when they start work as nurses this month. To boost their income, they care for elderly individuals living at home. Gustavo Ocando Alex for NPR hide caption

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Gustavo Ocando Alex for NPR

A child leaves for school in a village in India. Last November, the Indian government announced new rules limiting the weight of school bags depending on a child's age. But the rules are not always enforced. Punit Paranjpe /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe /AFP/Getty Images

You Think Your Kid's School Backpack Is Heavy? See What's Going On In India!

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Farmers Anil Geela, left, and Pilli Tirupati do their version of the Kiki Challenge, dancing to Drake's song "In My Feelings." In the mud. With oxen. My Village Show Vlogs via YouTube/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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My Village Show Vlogs via YouTube/screenshot by NPR

UK Biobank, based in Manchester, England, is the largest blood-based research project in the world. The research project will involve at least 500,000 people across the U.K., and follow their health for next 30 years or more, providing a resource for scientists battling diseases. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete

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Dr. Omar Salim Akhtar of Kashmir protested the clampdown on telephone and Internet communications by Indian authorities at a press conference on Aug. 26. He was later arrested, then released after a few hours. Muzamil Mattoo/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Muzamil Mattoo/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Esperance Nabintu, 42, an Ebola survivor, photographed on Aug. 15 in Goma. One of her children also contracted the disease and survived. But her husband, Rene Daniele Fataki, died from the disease. This photo was taken as friends and family gathered at her home to mourn and to celebrate his life. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

A paramedic takes a blood sample from a baby for an HIV test in Larkana, Pakistan, on May 9. The government has been offering screenings in response to an HIV outbreak. Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images

Man Kaur of India celebrates after competing in the 100-meter sprint in the 100+ age category at the World Masters Games in Auckland, New Zealand, in April 2017. Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images

First lady Rula Ghani at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. Earlier this year, she helped free more than 190 Afghan women and girls imprisoned for failing the virginity test after reproductive rights activist Farhad Javid brought it to her attention in October. Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Laborers in the sugar cane fields of Central America are experiencing a rapid and unexplained form of kidney failure. Above: Harvesting sugar cane in Chichigalpa, Nicaragua. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Whatever Happened To ... The Mysterious Kidney Disease Striking Central America?

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Computer illustration of malignant B-cell lymphocytes seen in Burkitt's lymphoma, the most common childhood cancer in sub-Saharan Africa. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images