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Didier Kassai uses comics to "transmit a message." His father opposed to a career in art until Kassai began earning money for his drawings. Here he sits in his office in Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic. Cassandra Vinograd for NPR hide caption

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Cassandra Vinograd for NPR

A mosquito's antenna responds to odors. Scientists are trying to figure out how the malaria parasite might trigger a change in body odor that draws in mosquitoes that carry the disease, like the Anopheles skeeter pictured above. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Winners of the 2018 Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship (from left) are Jennifer Pahlka, Harish Hande, Jess Ladd, Lesley Marincola, Anushka Ratnayake and Barbara Pierce Bush. David Fisher/Skoll Foundation hide caption

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David Fisher/Skoll Foundation
Hilary Fung/NPR

Yellow Fever Encroaches Megacities, Straining Global Vaccine Supply

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Extreme lack of attention is not unusual in hospitals in poor countries, says Martin Onyango, legal advisor for the Center for Reproductive Rights based in Nairobi. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters hide caption

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Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

A medical worker gives a toddler oxygen through a respirator following an alleged poison gas attack in eastern Ghouta, Syria on April 8. Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets via AP hide caption

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Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets via AP

Samuel Senessie, 25, at the site of last year's mudslide. He lost five members of his family and his home. He says he has not received the government support to which he should be entitled. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

See that little brown critter and that little white critter? They're goats stuck on a bridge in western Pennsylvania. The white goat is facing in the wrong direction to walk off the beam, about 100 feet high, and return to solid ground. Todd Tilson/PA Turnpike Commission hide caption

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Todd Tilson/PA Turnpike Commission