Global Health NPR news on world health issues, disease control, public health and sanitation, and health education. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Global Health

Clemantine Wamariya, who fled Rwanda as a girl, is now a U.S. citizen. She is a human rights advocate and a speaker. Steve Jennings/Getty Images for Free The Children hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Jennings/Getty Images for Free The Children

Rohingya refugees use a mock elephant during a training session on how to respond to elephant incursions at the Kutupalong refugee camp. The massive refugee camp sits in what used to be a migratory path for elephants moving between Myanmar and Bangladesh. Munir Uz Zaman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Munir Uz Zaman/Getty Images

Why Elephants Pose A Threat To Rohingya Refugees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/712415430/714591865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trying to make the world a better place: (left to right) Skoll Award winners Gregory Rockson of mPharma, Nicola Galombik and Maryana Iskander of Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator, Nancy Lublin of Crisis Text Line, Bright Simons of mPedigree and Julie Cordua of Thorn. Greg Smolonski/Skoll hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Smolonski/Skoll

Siddharth Dube, a longtime public health advocate, has written a memoir: An Indefinite Sentence: A Personal History of Outlawed Love and Sex. Hindustan Times/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hindustan Times/Getty Images

Sodul Amin, 30, is one of tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees who've gotten chickenpox since December. The highly contagious disease spreads easily in the overcrowded refugee camps. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Chickenpox, The Latest Burden On The Rohingya Refugees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711743116/712997088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Jankara market in Lagos, Nigeria. A group called Market March Movement is working to end street harassment in shopping districts across the country. Frédéric Soltan/via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frédéric Soltan/via Getty Images

The pronounced curve of this toe bone — the proximal phalanx — from a specimen of Homo luzonensis, an early human found in a Philippine cave, looks more like it came from tree-climbing Australopithecus than from a modern human, scientists say. Callao Cave Archaeology Project hide caption

toggle caption
Callao Cave Archaeology Project

Ancient Bones And Teeth Found In A Philippine Cave May Rewrite Human History

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710278943/711952003" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers repair the roof of a small shop while a woman hangs clothing to dry among debris in Beira, Mozambique. The city was badly damaged after Cyclone Idai hit on March 14. Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images

He Thought His City Was Prepared For Big Storms. Then Cyclone Idai Hit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711576607/711831901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Things in Venezuela are so bad that patients who are hospitalized must bring not only their own food but also medical supplies like syringes and scalpels as well as their own soap and water, a new report says. Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Poor diet is the leading risk factor for deaths from lifestyle-related diseases in the majority of the world, according to new research. John D. Buffington/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John D. Buffington/Getty Images

Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/709507504/709999412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The figure at left is the personification of cholera, facing resistance from a group of women. This 19th century engraving is from Barcelona. PHAS/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PHAS/UIG/Getty Images

After a long history of civil war and corruption, many Liberians didn't trust their government's attempts to control Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images
Qieer Wang for NPR

He Was Imprisoned And Losing His Mind. 'Anna Karenina' Saved Him

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/706870472/706989756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">