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This mosquito spreads dengue, Zika and yellow fever too. Could these diseases make a human emit an odor that draws the insect in to take a bite? Joao Paulo Burini/Getty Images hide caption

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Joao Paulo Burini/Getty Images

Why mosquitoes might find you irresistible. Hint: A viral lure

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This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP hide caption

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Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP

Wajahat Malik, right, and a Pakistan Navy seaman navigate the Indus River. Malik organized a 40-day expedition down the 2,000-mile river to document "the peoples, the cultures, the biodiversity and just whatever comes our way," he says — including the impact of climate change and pollution. Diaa Hadid/For NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/For NPR

Floating in a rubber dinghy, a filmmaker documents the Indus River's water woes

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A patient talks with a nurse at a traveling contraception clinic in Madagascar run by MSI Reproductive Choices, an organization that provides contraception and safe abortion services in 37 countries. The group condemned the overturn of Roe v. Wade and warned that the ruling could stymie abortion access overseas. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Aerial view of the Beckton Sewage Treatment Works in London. Between February and May, U.K. scientists found several samples containing closely related versions of the polio virus in wastewater at the plant. mwmbwls/Flickr hide caption

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mwmbwls/Flickr

A reactive to test suspected monkeypox samples is seen inside a fridge at the microbiology laboratory of La Paz Hospital on June 06, 2022 in Madrid, Spain. Europe is at the centre of the monkeypox virus outbreak, the World Health Organization reported 780 confirmed cases with Britain, Spain and Portugal reporting the largest numbers of patients. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Warning Vulnerable Populations About Monkeypox Without Stigmatizing Them

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Freetown Elementary School students Mason Santos, left, and Mila Talbot, right, pet Huntah the dog after she finishes checking a classroom. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

Dogs trained to sniff out COVID in schools are getting a lot of love for their efforts

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A medical technician shows a suspected monkeypox sample at the microbiology laboratory of La Paz Hospital on June 6 in Madrid. The World Health Organization is working with experts on changing the name of the virus. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

Burundian refugee Richard Samuel, 14, holds his homemade guitar as he waits to be transferred to Nyarugusu refugee camp in Tanzania in 2015. Daniel Hayduk/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Hayduk/AFP via Getty Images

Author Linda Villarosa pictured next to her book, Under the Skin. Nic Villarosa hide caption

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Nic Villarosa

The impact of COVID-19, a million deaths in

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Health-care staff in remote clinics in Ecuador have struggled to provide pandemic resources for their patients. Kata Karáth for Undark hide caption

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Kata Karáth for Undark

Amelia Ngola, 30, marks out the location of a suspected landmine before beginning to excavate the area in a minefield in Benguela province, Angola. The first step is to dig down and find out if it was a mine that set off her mine detector or something else — say, a rusty soda can or an old bullet casing. If it is indeed a mine, then it will be marked with stakes and signs until it's destroyed. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Fishermen haul in a fishing net in the eastern central Atlantic off Senegal. Belgian photographer Pierre Vanneste documents commercial fishing in his black-and-white photos. Pierre Vanneste for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Vanneste for NPR

Cinnamon and cardamon bun served in a Swedish cafe, often eaten at fika – a Swedish word that's often translated as "coffee and cake break." Malcolm P Chapman/Getty Images hide caption

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Malcolm P Chapman/Getty Images

#SwedenGate sparks food fight: Why some countries share meals more than others

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A positive result on a home COVID test. If you catch it once, can you catch it again? Turns out the answer is: Yes. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A baby receives care in the neonatal intensive care unit of the government hospital in Tripoli, Lebanon. Because of the lack of prenatal care amid the country's massive economic crisis, medical staff members say more newborns are born sick and weak. From time to time, when parents don't have the funds to pay for additional care, they go home — and leave their infant stranded at the hospital. Arezou Rezvani/NPR hide caption

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Arezou Rezvani/NPR

Lebanon's hospitals are running out of medicine and staff in ongoing economic crisis

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Above: a monkeypox lesion. The lesions in cases that are part of the 2022 outbreak are often first seen on genitalia or the anus. Spread to other parts of the body is possible but doesn't always occur. U.K. Health Security Agency hide caption

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U.K. Health Security Agency