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Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

A health worker gives a polio vaccine to a child in Karachi, Pakistan, on May 23. British health authorities on Wednesday said they will offer a polio booster dose to children aged 1 to 9 in London, after finding evidence the virus has been spreading in multiple regions of the capital. Fareed Khan/AP hide caption

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Fareed Khan/AP

This iamge provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows a colorized transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox particles (orange) found within an infected cell (brown), cultured in the laboratory. NIAID via AP hide caption

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NIAID via AP

How Monkeypox Became A Public Health Emergency

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A screenshot of a map showing case counts of COVID-19 reported in different animal species, part of an interactive COVID data tracking dashboard rendered by Complexity Science Hub Vienna. The drawings represent the type of animal, including both domestic and wild; the size of the bubbles reflects the number of cases in each locale. Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR

A person arrives for a monkeypox vaccination at a New York health care center. Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS

Monkeypox: The myths, misconceptions — and facts — about how you catch it

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People protest during a rally calling for more government action to combat the spread of monkeypox at Foley Square on July 21, 2022 in New York City. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

Scanning electron micrograph of Salmonella typhi, the parasite that causes typhoid fever (in yellow-green, attached to another bacterial cell. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

An Afghan woman walks with a child in Kabul, Afghanistan, April 28, 2022. A newly released report from Amnesty International, "Death in Slow Motion," focuses on a range of issues affecting girls and women. Foremost among them are child and forced marriage. WAKIL KOHSAR/Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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WAKIL KOHSAR/Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

A health worker walks inside an isolation ward for monkeypox patients at a hospital in Ahmedabad, India. Sam Panthaky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Panthaky/AFP via Getty Images

Monkeypox FAQ: How contagious? Are kids at risk? If you had chickenpox are you safe?

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From left to right: Alice Paredes, Sriya Chippalthurty, Liliana Talino and Natalia Perez Morales are Girl Up "teen advisers" who give up their hobbies to help disadvantaged girls and women in their communities. Girl Up hide caption

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Girl Up

Sir Mark Lowcock, the former head of the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, has written a memoir, Relief Chief: A Manifesto for Saving Lives in Dire Times. In 2017, he was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath for his work in international development. Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images

Pakistani breeder Hasan Narejo displays the ears of his baby goat Simba, in Karachi on July 6. The kid's ears have gone viral, attracting praise — and trolls. Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images