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Would you remember exactly what was in this salad more than a week after eating it?

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Luciana Bueno Santos (LuBueno)/iStockphoto.com

Haiti Grapples With Highest Cholera Rate In World

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A Haitian protester in Port-au-Prince last month spray-paints a wall, equating the UN mission in Haiti (abbreviated here as MINISTA) with cholera.

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Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images

A mother held her baby as she received an experimental malaria vaccine at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya in Oct. 2009.

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Karel Prinsloo/AP

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Slashes Infection Risk By Half

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Paul Keim at work in his lab on the Northern Arizona University campus.

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Charlie McCallie/Northern Arizona University

Afghan men wait to receive psychiatric treatment in a Kabul hospital. Scarred by decades of war, social problems and poverty, more than 60 percent of Afghans suffer from stress disorders and mental health problems.

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SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images

Early morning view of an automated irrigation system in on a farm in Sudlersville, MD

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Cliff Owen/AP

Facing Planetary Enemy No. 1: Agriculture

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Popular Contraceptive In Africa Increases HIV Risk

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Dr. Ralph Steinman of Rockefeller University died Friday, three days before he was named a winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for "his discovery of the dendritic cell and its role in adaptive immunity."

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Mike Groll/AP

The Real Virologist Behind "Contagion"

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Seeds from Golden Rain acacias like these in Wales provide the active ingredient for a pill to help people stop smoking. Tom Patterson/Flickr hide caption

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Tom Patterson/Flickr