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Health worker Jackie Carnegie delivers a rubella vaccine in Colorado in 1972. Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post via Getty Images

Western Hemisphere Wipes Out Its Third Virus

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Amar Baramu carried his 70-year-old mother on his back for five hours, then rode with her on a bus for 12 more, to get her to a hospital for the head wound she suffered during the earthquake. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

He Carried His Mom On His Back For 5 Hours En Route To Medical Care

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Now this is an international baby: Born to a surrogate mom in Nepal (who was implanted with an egg from a South African donor) and now living in Israel with his parents, Amir Vogel Greengold (left) and Gilad Greengold. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Israeli Dads Welcome Surrogate-Born Baby In Nepal On Earthquake Day

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Fake medicines are a 21st-century scourge, but they've been around for a long time. This advertising trade card for snake oil was printed in New York City around 1880. Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images hide caption

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Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images

Mmm. Smells just like your identical twin. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Why Do Mosquitoes Like To Bite You Best? It's In Your Genes

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They don't call him Mr. Toilet for nothing! On a cold and windy November day, Jack Sim visited NPR and gladly struck a pose on his favorite appliance. Note: This toilet was not hooked up. Ryan Kellman and John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman and John W. Poole/NPR

WHO Leader Says End Of Ebola Outbreak Is Near, But Hard Work Remains

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Liberian workers dismantle shelters in an Ebola treatment center in the Paynes Ville neighborhood of Monrovia. Doctors Without Borders closed the center last month because it was no longer needed. Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images

A woman cultivates seaweed off the coast of Madagascar to counter overfishing. She's working with Blue Ventures, a business that supports its conservation projects by giving ecotours. Courtesy of Skoll Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of Skoll Foundation

In the 1950s, the World Bank funded the creation of the world's largest man-made dam, the Kariba Dam, which sits on the border of Zimbabwe and Zambia. The construction of such dams can have dire consequences for poor people living near a river, an investigation found. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

When The World Bank Does More Harm Than Good

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