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An urban farmer waters his plants near Bamako, Mali, where the government has set aside nearly 250 acres for market gardens. donkeycart/Flickr hide caption

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donkeycart/Flickr

A doctor examines chest X-rays at a tuberculosis clinic in Gugulethu, Cape Town, South Africa in late 2007. The number of TB cases that don't respond to both first- and second-line medications is rising worldwide. Karin Schermbrucker /AP hide caption

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Karin Schermbrucker /AP

Families wait for hours to register at the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan along the northern border in early July. Within a few weeks, the population of the camp more than doubled, leading to shortages of food, water and medicine. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Family members and friends gather around 8-day-old Israeli baby Oz Naftaly Cohen after his traditional Jewish circumcision ceremony in 2005. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

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Ariel Schalit/AP

Some Israeli Parents Rethink Ritual Circumcision

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Childhood obesity is on the rise in many countries and overuse of antibiotics is now on the radar as a possible factor in the epidemic. Here 18-month-old twins are weighed in a nutritionist's office in Colombia. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of doses of cholera vaccine sit in a refrigerated trailer in a United Nations compound in Saint-Marc, Haiti, in March. After some delays, a vaccination project proved successful. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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John Poole/NPR

Solar Toilet Disinfects Waste, Makes Hydrogen Fuel

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Aging City Pipes In Need Of A Plumber's Touch

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A man smokes a bidi on "No Tobacco Day," May 31, in Allahabad, India. These small, hand-rolled cigarettes are popular in India and Bangladesh because they are far cheaper than regular cigarettes. Rajesh Kumar/AP hide caption

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Rajesh Kumar/AP

Bill Gates, co-founder of the the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, checks out a toilet demo at the Reinvent the Toilet Fair in Seattle, Wash. The festival featured prototypes of high-tech toilets developed by researchers around the world. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation hide caption

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Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Bill Gates Crowns Toilet Innovators At Sanitation Fair

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Care managers tend elderly people in March 2012 in Minamisoma, Japan. The home's residents were evacuated eight days after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station was crippled by the March 11, 2011 tsunami. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

A newly discovered disease in boa constrictors could provide the missing link in the latent Ebola virus. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

How A Virus In Snakes Could Offer Clues To Ebola In Humans

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