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Girls carry containers of water filled from the local communal tap Zimbabwe, which is in the grip of a nationwide drought that has been linked to climate change. The government has appealed for $464 million in aid to stave off famine. Cynthia R. Matonhodze/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Cynthia R. Matonhodze/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Why Climate Change Poses A Particular Threat To Child Health

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Fish broker Khout Phany, 39, (under umbrella) sits while fishermen bring their catch to be weighed in Chhnok Tru, a fishing village at the southern tip of the Tonle Sap lake where it meets the river. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

People cover their faces with masks to avoid thick smog in New Delhi on Nov. 5. People living there have complained about respiratory problems. Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images

Indonesians independently carry out fumigation in their neighborhood to eradicate the larvae of mosquitoes that cause dengue fever. A new vaccine to prevent dengue may be on the horizon. Aditya Irawan/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Aditya Irawan/NurPhoto/Getty Images

There May Be A New Tool In The Battle Against Dengue

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Malassezia is a genus of fungi naturally found on the skin surfaces of many animals, including humans. The researchers found it in urban apartments, although some strains have been known to cause infections in hospitals. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Until recently, the Chinese public has been slow to embrace the #MeToo movement. One social media celebrity hopes to change that. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Fatou "Toufah" Jallow says she was raped by former Gambian president Yahya Jammeh. She now lives in Canada but returned home to testify before the nation's Truth Commission. 2019 Human Rights Watch hide caption

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2019 Human Rights Watch

Beauty Queen's Rape Allegation Against Former Gambia President Sparks #MeToo Movement

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Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe first encountered Ebola in 1976, before it had been identified. Since then, from his post at the Congo National Institute for Biomedical Research, he has led the global search for a cure. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

This Congolese Doctor Discovered Ebola But Never Got Credit For It — Until Now

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Nesma (left) and Anys are Algerian siblings who came out to each other at a party. They live in Paris, and both identify as queer. "It now makes us stronger and committed together for the queer and Algerian causes," Anys says. Mikael Chukwuma Owunna hide caption

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Mikael Chukwuma Owunna