Goats and Soda We're all neighbors on our tiny globe. The poor and the rich and everyone in between. We'll explore the downs and ups of life in this global village.
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

The FDA says one home test is not enough if you've been exposed to someone with COVID or are experiencing COVID-like symptoms. That initial negative ... could turn positive a day or two later. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Max Posner/NPR

A doctor checks chest x-rays of a tuberculosis patient at a clinic in Mumbai, India, that treats those with drug-resistant strains of the disease. Two new studies look at how drug resistance might be overcome. Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images

Vision divine du 11 Mars 1948, is a series of eight drawings by Ivoirian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré. They depict a vision that Bouabré said he experienced that year: "seven colored suns" creating a "circle of beauty around their 'mother-sun.' " This piece and other works from Bouabré are part of an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art. The Museum of Modern Art hide caption

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The Museum of Modern Art

A screenshot of a map showing case counts of COVID-19 reported in different animal species, part of an interactive COVID data tracking dashboard rendered by Complexity Science Hub Vienna. The drawings represent the type of animal, including both domestic and wild; the size of the bubbles reflects the number of cases in each locale. Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR

A person arrives for a monkeypox vaccination at a New York health care center. Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS

Monkeypox: The myths, misconceptions — and facts — about how you catch it

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People protest during a rally calling for more government action to combat the spread of monkeypox at Foley Square on July 21, 2022 in New York City. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

Scanning electron micrograph of Salmonella typhi, the parasite that causes typhoid fever (in yellow-green, attached to another bacterial cell. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Dr. Dimie Ogoina, professor of medicine and infectious diseases at Niger Delta University in Nigeria. Over the past few years, he has tried to warn health officials that the monkeypox virus had changed, but few listened. Right: The monkeypox isolation ward of Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Dr. Dimie Ogoina hide caption

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Dr. Dimie Ogoina

He discovered the origin of the monkeypox outbreak — and tried to warn the world

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An Afghan woman walks with a child in Kabul, Afghanistan, April 28, 2022. A newly released report from Amnesty International, "Death in Slow Motion," focuses on a range of issues affecting girls and women. Foremost among them are child and forced marriage. WAKIL KOHSAR/Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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WAKIL KOHSAR/Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

A health worker walks inside an isolation ward for monkeypox patients at a hospital in Ahmedabad, India. Sam Panthaky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Panthaky/AFP via Getty Images

Monkeypox FAQ: How contagious? Are kids at risk? If you had chickenpox are you safe?

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From left to right: Alice Paredes, Sriya Chippalthurty, Liliana Talino and Natalia Perez Morales are Girl Up "teen advisers" who give up their hobbies to help disadvantaged girls and women in their communities. Girl Up hide caption

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Girl Up

Sir Mark Lowcock, the former head of the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, has written a memoir, Relief Chief: A Manifesto for Saving Lives in Dire Times. In 2017, he was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath for his work in international development. Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images

Pakistani breeder Hasan Narejo displays the ears of his baby goat Simba, in Karachi on July 6. The kid's ears have gone viral, attracting praise — and trolls. Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images

Fred Mutebi, a Ugandan artist, holds up one of his paintings, which uses traditional Ugandan barkcloth as a canvas. Madeleine Callanan hide caption

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Madeleine Callanan

Brazilian scientist Sotiris Missailidis heads research and development at his country's premier agency for vaccine development, the Bio-Manguinhos Fiocruz Foundation. He's been a key advocate for shifting Brazil's strategy toward inventing its own vaccines. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

A dire moment in the pandemic ... was the chance he'd been waiting for

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