Goats and Soda We're all neighbors on our tiny globe. The poor and the rich and everyone in between. We'll explore the downs and ups of life in this global village.
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

A COVID-19 home test in the U.S. comes with a swab to swirl in the nostrils. But some users say they're swabbing the throat too — even though that's not what the instructions say to do. "They may stab themselves," cautions Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting head of the Food and Drug Administration. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Two of the children who came for a meal at a soup kitchen in Caracas run by the charity Alimenta la Solidaridad. It serves about 100 people and operates Monday through Friday. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Why the kids of Venezuela aren't getting enough to eat

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A woman inspects her former home, which was destroyed after Cyclone Fani tore through parts of coastal Bangladesh and India in April and May 2019. Zakir Hossain Chowdhury/The New Humanitarian hide caption

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Zakir Hossain Chowdhury/The New Humanitarian

Health workers administer COVID tests outside a building placed under lockdown in Hong Kong on Jan. 6. Hong Kong is imposing strict new COVID measures for the first time in almost a year as the omicron variant seeps into the community. Louise Delmotte//Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Louise Delmotte//Bloomberg via Getty Images

Welcome to the era of omicron rules and regs

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A man distributes bread outside a bakery in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Dec. 2. According to U.N. figures, some 23 million people in Afghanistan suffer from extreme levels of hunger. Petros Giannakouris/AP hide caption

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Petros Giannakouris/AP

For many Afghans, winter is forcing a cruel choice of whether to eat or stay warm

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Dr. Peter Hotez and Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi of Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine have developed a COVID-19 vaccine that could prove beneficial to countries with fewer resources. Max Trautner/Texas Children's Hospital hide caption

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Max Trautner/Texas Children's Hospital

A Texas team comes up with a COVID vaccine that could be a global game changer

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Married at 15, Chakraman Shreshta Balami fulfilled his dying father's wish by getting married — at age 15. He had to give up his dream of becoming a doctor. Now the vice principal of Sri Bhavani government school, he campaigns against child marriage — but even his son was married as a teenager. Above, he poses with a grandchild. Stephanie Sinclair for NPR hide caption

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Stephanie Sinclair for NPR

A 8-year-old looks out her bedroom window during self-quarantine with her family due to COVID-19. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

An empty classroom during the pandemic in Seoul, South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

$17 trillion: That's how much the pandemic could take away from today's kids

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Our correspondent Michaeleen Doucleff's daughter, Rosy, at age 2, as she does dishes voluntarily. Getting her involved in chores did lead to the kitchen being flooded and dishes being broken, Doucleff reports. But Rosy is still eager to help. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR

How to raise kind kids, a booze ban, BTS at U.N.: Our top non-pandemic global stories

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Selvi is a construction worker in Chennai, India. "My bones ache at night after carrying heavy loads through the day, my eyes sting from the dust and I cough often, but if I didn't do this, my kids and I would starve." she says. Kamala Thiagarajan for NPR hide caption

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Kamala Thiagarajan for NPR

Seydou Keïta/SKPE—Courtesy CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection Seydou Keïta/SKPE/CAAC/The Pigozzi Collection hide caption

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Seydou Keïta/SKPE/CAAC/The Pigozzi Collection