Coronavirus World Map: Tracking The Spread Of The Outbreak : Goats and Soda A map of confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths around the world. The respiratory disease has spread rapidly across six continents and has killed more than 4 million globally.

Coronavirus World Map: We've Now Passed The 200 Million Mark For Infections

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In late January 2020 only a few dozen COVID-19 infections had been identified outside of China. A year later, the world tallied its first 100 million cases. It took the globe just 7 months to pass the 200 million mark, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Now the virus has spread to every corner of the globe and has been blamed for more than 4.6 million deaths.

The United States, India and Brazil in that order have had the most COVID cases and the three nations collectively account for almost half of all recorded infections so far in the pandemic.

Explore the chart below to find a country-by-country breakdown of new and total cases since January 2020.

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Explore how the number of coronavirus cases have shifted in different parts of the world over time. The first chart compares each continent to each other, while the next charts highlight the number of cases in select countries by region.

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To compare country outbreaks, the chart below graphs trend lines for average new daily cases and deaths against each country's totals to date. This type of visualization highlights a state's daily growth or decline relative to the overall size of its outbreak.

When both new and total case and death counts grow quickly, the curves bend upward. As new cases and deaths slow, the curves level or bend down. In countries like Israel, which is seeing a second wave of case growth after an initial wave in April, the line forms a V-shape, as the initially bent curve spikes upwards again.

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Click here to see the state-by-state breakdown of cases in the United States.

This story was originally published on March 30, 2020.