Health : Goats and Soda Health

A patient talks with a nurse at a traveling contraception clinic in Madagascar run by the British nonprofit group Marie Stopes International. The organization is one of many that has decided to give up U.S. funding because it deems Trump's ban on providing abortion referrals to be ethically unacceptable. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

A Pakistani health worker administers the oral polio vaccine to a child during a campaign in Karachi on May 7. Because of past attacks on vaccinators, security personnel are often assigned to accompany them. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Wipe Out Polio In Pakistan

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This red blood cell is swollen by the malaria parasite. In this image from a transmission electron micrograph, the blood cell has been colored red and the single-cell malaria parasite has been colored green. Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source hide caption

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Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source

How A Cheap Magnet Might Help Detect Malaria

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A demonstration in Copenhagen, Denmark, in support of Syrian migrants. A new study looks at the benefit of offering physical and psychological support to refugees who have been tortured. Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images
Fabio Consoli/for NPR

Is Sleeping With Your Baby As Dangerous As Doctors Say?

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On May 13, people suspected of having the Ebola virus wait at a treatment center in the village of Bikoro, where the outbreak began in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. John Bompengo/AP hide caption

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John Bompengo/AP

Ebola Outbreak: How Worried Should We Be?

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A woman is vaccinated at a health center in Conakry, Guinea, during the clinical trials of a vaccine against the Ebola virus. Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images

Can The New Ebola Vaccine Stop The Latest Outbreak?

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Dario Garcia, who lives in Panama, volunteers to visit people who are HIV-positive to see whether they are taking their medications. Garcia himself is HIV-positive. "I feel alone," he says. "I believe the most support I have now is from others who have been diagnosed." Jacob McCleland for NPR hide caption

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Jacob McCleland for NPR

Stella Nyanzi arrives at the High Court in Kampala, Uganda, in April 2017. She had been jailed for "cyber-harassment" of the president. Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images

She Strips, She Swears, She Goes To Jail ... For The Good Of Her Country

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Barkatullah smiles and rests on a crutch and grips his walker during a physical therapy session at Emergency War and Trauma Hospital in Kabul. The 13-year-old lost his right arm and leg in an explosion. He practices standing on the walker 30 seconds at a time. Ivan Armando Flores for NPR hide caption

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Ivan Armando Flores for NPR

A mosquito's antenna responds to odors. Scientists are trying to figure out how the malaria parasite might trigger a change in body odor that draws in mosquitoes that carry the disease, like the Anopheles skeeter pictured above. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images