Development : Goats and Soda Development
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Development

Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, the new mayor of Freetown in Sierra Leone, speaks at the 2018 Concordia Annual Summit in New York City. "For decades, there had been no structure, no focused thinking of a strategy for the city," she says. "The way my brain works is with plans. I have to have a to-do list." Riccardo Savi/Getty Images hide caption

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Riccardo Savi/Getty Images

The circles on the map pinpoint the location of thousands of Chinese-funded development projects. The bigger the circle, the bigger the investment. The largest circles represent projects in the multibillion-dollar range. Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR

A Somali fisherman carries a fish to the market near the port in Mogadishu. One of the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals calls for the world to "conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development." Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images

Mohamed Yonus (dark shirt, green skirt) carries his distribution bag to his home in the Hakimpara refugee camp. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

The Refugees Who Don't Want To Go Home ... Yet

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Victoria Falls sits on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. Photos of beautiful scenes from Africa and Haiti have been flooding the Internet in response to President Trump's reported slur. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Clockwise from top left: Bad selfie; "tree man" disease; Hadza man eating honeycomb; toilet from Amber, India; mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe and deer tick. Clockwise from top left: SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Hadassah; Matthieu Paley/National Geographic; Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street; Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; and Stephen Reiss for NPR. hide caption

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Clockwise from top left: SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Hadassah; Matthieu Paley/National Geographic; Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street; Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; and Stephen Reiss for NPR.

The team that won the Hult Prize poses with their trophy on September 16 at U.N. headquarters. From left: Gia Farooqi, Hanaa Lakhani, Moneeb Mian, and Hasan Usmani. They developed a ride-sharing rickshaw service for refugees in a Pakistan slum. Jason DeCrow/Hult Prize Foundation via AP Ima hide caption

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Jason DeCrow/Hult Prize Foundation via AP Ima

Each year thousands of people from around the world tour the Gomantong Cave in Borneo. Although scientists have found a potentially dangerous virus in bats that roost in the cave, no one has ever gotten sick from a trip here. Razis Nasri hide caption

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Razis Nasri

The Next Pandemic Could Be Dripping On Your Head

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