Women & Girls : Goats and Soda Women & Girls
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Women & Girls

Sierra Leone President Julius Maada Bio, pictured here at a press conference in May 2018, last week declared rape and sexual violence a national emergency. Sia Kambou /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sia Kambou /AFP/Getty Images

A laborer climbs a tree to pluck coconuts at a farm in India. Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images

Kerala Needs Coconut Pickers — So Women Are Stepping In (And Climbing Up)

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From left: Man Kaur of India celebrates after competing in the 100-meter sprint in the 100+ age category at the World Masters Games in Auckland, New Zealand; an illustration inspired by a list of global poverty thinkers being called a "Sausagefest"; Maryangel Garcia Ramos, 32, a disability activist from Mexico. From left: Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images; Hanna Barczyk for NPR; and Antonio Escobar hide caption

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From left: Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images; Hanna Barczyk for NPR; and Antonio Escobar

In the video game Darshan Diversion, avatars of women in red saris try to reach the top of a temple but are thwarted by Hindu priests if a red blinking light indicates that the women are menstruating. Screenshot by Padmini Ray Murray hide caption

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Screenshot by Padmini Ray Murray

Some images from Goats and Soda's top stories of 2018. From left: changing the way we sit to fix back pain; is sleeping with your baby dangerous?; men walk near the site where the body of an 8-year-old girl, who was raped and murdered, was found. From left: Lily Padula for NPR; Fabio Consoli for NPR; Channi Anand/AP hide caption

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From left: Lily Padula for NPR; Fabio Consoli for NPR; Channi Anand/AP

A woman walks down the main road in the village of Luvungi in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In 2010, Hutu rebels and local militias raped more than 280 women and children as punishment for the villagers' alleged support of the Congolese Defense Forces. Marc Hoffer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Hoffer/AFP/Getty Images

A woman attends a march marking the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in Asuncion, Paraguay, on November 25. Paraguay is one of the Latin American countries that has passed a law categorizing femicide — killing a woman because of her gender — as a specific crime. Jorge Saenz/AP hide caption

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Jorge Saenz/AP

Activists protest in Mumbai to support Bollywood actress Tanushree Dutta, who has spoken out about an alleged case of sexual harassment. Women in India are naming and shaming their abusers on social media. Rafiq Maqbool/AP hide caption

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Rafiq Maqbool/AP

Sakshi Satpathy at the U.N.'s headquarters in March. On Thursday, she received an award from the Girl Scouts at the U.N. for her work to fight child marriage and human trafficking. Courtesy of Sakshi Satpathy hide caption

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Courtesy of Sakshi Satpathy

Nadia Murad, from the Yazidi community in Iraq, is the co-winner of this year's Nobel Peace Prize. She was enslaved for three months by ISIS and sexually assaulted. Now she speaks out for victims of sexual enslavement. Julian Stratenschulte /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte /AFP/Getty Images

Why The Nobel Peace Prize Made This Year's Winner Cry For Her Mother

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Sangita Magar bears the scars of an acid attack that took place three years ago. She was a plaintiff in a public interest case to change Nepal's law on acid and burn violence. Sajana Shrestha for NPR hide caption

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Sajana Shrestha for NPR

Deputy sergeant Mauwa Saleh is the coordinator of the seven Gender and Children desks in Zanzibar. These desks are staffed by police officers who have received training on how to interview victims and investigate reports of gender-based violence. Rebecca Grant for NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Grant for NPR

Maria Toorpakai, a top squash player from Pakistan, is the star of a PBS documentary airing on July 23. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

A Nigerian sex worker in Italy waits for clients. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP

Italian Cops Try To Stop A Sex Trafficking Gang Called Black Axe

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