Women & Girls : Goats and Soda Women & Girls

Activists protest in Mumbai to support Bollywood actress Tanushree Dutta, who has spoken out about an alleged case of sexual harassment. Women in India are naming and shaming their abusers on social media. Rafiq Maqbool/AP hide caption

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Rafiq Maqbool/AP

Sakshi Satpathy at the U.N.'s headquarters in March. On Thursday, she received an award from the Girl Scouts at the U.N. for her work to fight child marriage and human trafficking. Courtesy of Sakshi Satpathy hide caption

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Courtesy of Sakshi Satpathy

Nadia Murad, from the Yazidi community in Iraq, is the co-winner of this year's Nobel Peace Prize. She was enslaved for three months by ISIS and sexually assaulted. Now she speaks out for victims of sexual enslavement. Julian Stratenschulte /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte /AFP/Getty Images

Why The Nobel Peace Prize Made This Year's Winner Cry For Her Mother

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Sangita Magar bears the scars of an acid attack that took place three years ago. She was a plaintiff in a public interest case to change Nepal's law on acid and burn violence. Sajana Shrestha for NPR hide caption

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Sajana Shrestha for NPR

Deputy sergeant Mauwa Saleh is the coordinator of the seven Gender and Children desks in Zanzibar. These desks are staffed by police officers who have received training on how to interview victims and investigate reports of gender-based violence. Rebecca Grant for NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Grant for NPR

Maria Toorpakai, a top squash player from Pakistan, is the star of a PBS documentary airing on July 23. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

A Nigerian sex worker in Italy waits for clients. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP

Italian Cops Try To Stop A Sex Trafficking Gang Called Black Axe

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Extreme lack of attention is not unusual in hospitals in poor countries, says Martin Onyango, legal advisor for the Center for Reproductive Rights based in Nairobi. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters hide caption

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Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

Ya Kaka, left, and Hauwa, right, who were captured by Boko Haram in 2014, pose with Statue of Liberty impersonators in Times Square. Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed hide caption

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Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed

Durga, now 22, was married in her northern Indian village at the age of 15. Her father forced her into the marriage. But he had a change of heart right after the wedding and refused to send her to her husband. After much careful diplomacy, he managed to dissolve the union. Swati Vashishtha for NPR hide caption

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Swati Vashishtha for NPR

Agnes Igoye celebrates her birthday on International Women's Day. Above, Igoye, an anti-trafficking activist in Uganda, attends the 2016 DVF (Diane von Furstenberg) Awards in New York City. Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images

From left, Zainabu Hamayaji, who pretended to be mad to keep her children from being abducted by Boko Haram; Malebogo Malefhe, a winner of the 2017 International Women of Courage award; Eqbal Dauqan, a scientist from Yemen who could no longer work because of the conflict but then found a way to continue her career as a refugee. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR, Ryan Eskalis/NPR, Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR, Ryan Eskalis/NPR, Sanjit Das for NPR