Poverty : Goats and Soda Poverty

A little girl fills two jerrycans with water in the Korangi slum in Karachi. Fetching water is a duty that often falls on very young children. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

For Karachi's Water Mafia, Stolen H2O Is A 'Lucrative Business'

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Donald Trump Jr. at a photo session after visiting Trump Tower Kolkata, a Trump Organization apartment building in India. Its website says it is "synonymous with celebrated luxury." Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The town sign stands in the snow at the entrance to Davos, Switzerland, host to the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum taking place this week. Donald Trump will be among the attendees. David Keyton/AP hide caption

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David Keyton/AP

Mohamed Yonus (dark shirt, green skirt) carries his distribution bag to his home in the Hakimpara refugee camp. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

The Refugees Who Don't Want To Go Home ... Yet

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Sally Deng for NPR

Want To Help Someone In A Poor Village? Give Them A Bus Ticket Out

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Water polluted by mine runoff in West Virginia. Philip Alston, the U.N. envoy, cites a ranking of 178 countries by access to drinking water and sanitation. The United States trails behind many wealthy countries, coming in at No. 36. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Women line up to vaccinate their children in Kitahurira village, Uganda. Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images

Health Care Costs Push A Staggering Number Of People Into Extreme Poverty

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Some workers in low-income countries are choosing bitcoin, a virtual currency powered by blockchain technology, to send money to their families. It's cheaper, faster and doesn't require a middleman. Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The M-PESA agent who works in this shop is part of a vast network of small-time vendors. Screengrab by NPR/YouTube hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR/YouTube

Dial M For Money: Can Mobile Banking Lift People Out Of Poverty?

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